St John's Church of England,Moruya

Harvest Festivals and Agricultural Shows – a time of plenty

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

FESTIVAL – Harvest Festival services have been arranged for Sunday next at St. John’s Church, both morning and evening. The special preacher at the evening service will be the Rev. Canon Macdonnell, of Goulburn. The parishioners are invited to send gifts of cereals, fruit and vegetables to decorate the church and the useful things will, after the services, be donated to the local hospital. Considering the bountiful season this district has experienced, these services ought to appeal to everyone, and a hearty response made to the request for gifts.   13/2/1915

St John's Church of England,Moruya

St John’s Church of England,Moruya

MORUYA A. AND P. SOCIETY. – 41ST ANNUAL SHOW – …The Moruya Annual Show of 1915 was held on Wednesday and Thursday last under the most favourable auspices. Arrangements having been made with the Government to allow the Society £300 for removal expenses in lieu of the old Show ground of 8 ½ acres near the River, the committee at once set to work, and during the year removed the whole of the buildings, ring and yard fences to their present picturesque position on the Moruya Park. The Pavilion is erected on the eastern side of the Race Club’s Saddling paddock and the horse ring just in front of the Grand Stand, the cattle yards, pig pens and fowl coops having a lovely position on higher ground at the rear.

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon  photographed in their carriage at the Moruya Show in 1915

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon photographed in their carriage at the Moruya Show in 1915

The pavilion at Moruya Showground

OFFICIAL OPENING – Just prior to luncheon on the second day the ceremony of officially declaring the new Pavilion opened was performed by our Federal member Mr. Austin Chapman. Mr. D. Hutchinson, president of the Society, in introducing Mr. Chapman referred to the removal of the Show appointments from the old to the present new site. The change he said had cost about £400, about £300 of which had been given by the Government – and for which he had to thank the Labor Government – the balance having been expended by the Society. Captain Millard, our State member was also deserving of much kudos for the way he had worked the Government to vote the £300.

On rising, our Federal Member was greeted with a round of applause. He eloquently congratulated the Society on the improved change it had made from the old to the new premises. When at Berry he had expressed the opinion that the Berry Show ground appointments were about the best in the State. Since seeing Moruya appointments and the beautiful position it occupied he would have to retract that statement, for he now considered Moruya took the belt in that connection…Mr. Chapman dwelt on the great possibilities of the Moruya district and the probabilities of a coastal railway in the not far distant future…. Mr. Chapman then declared the new Show Ground opened.   13/2/1915

QUEEN STREET BOOT HOSPITAL – F. BENNETT has purchased the BOOT-REPAIRING BUSINESS recently carried on by Mr. E. Vaughan, in Vulcan Street. By using only the Best Material, combined with Good Workmanship, Attention to Business, the Prompt Delivery of Repairs entrusted to his care, and Moderate Charges, he hopes to merit a fair share of Public Patronage.   13/2/1915

Queen Street looking west - from Vulcan St towards Page Street. You can see the boot makers on the left hand side of the street.

Queen Street looking west – from Vulcan St towards Page Street. You can see the boot makers on the left hand side of the street.

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya  – http://www.mdhs.org.au.

Our latest publication Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

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News from Egypt AND an Oriental Circus – 100 years ago

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

NEWS FROM EGYPT – The following interesting letter has been received by Mr. & Mrs. G. Walter of the local Post Office, from their son Clem, who is with the Australian troops in Egypt: –

Mena Camp, Pyramids
Cairo Egypt
20/12/14

“Today our 3rd Battalion took part in a huge ceremony in Cairo, the taking over of Egypt. There are twelve Battalions here and only two were required to attend the procession, so you can imagine how proud we were when our colonel told us we were chosen, the seventh was the second choice. The remainder were very much cut up about the selection. We left camp at 6 a.m. and went by tram to Cairo, 10 miles.

On our arrival there we were lined up along the street for about a mile, one line on each side with fixed bayonets and 20 rounds of ball ammunition. There were thousands of spectators on top of buildings etc. We presented arms to the Sultan as he drove by in his magnificent carriage …After the ceremony we marched to the Barracks where we received light refreshments and a few minutes rest, then we marched back to Camp on an asphalt road, which made our feet very tired. We march to Cairo again on Wednesday, the whole of the Australian Troops 27,000, so it will be a fair sized procession. Richie and I go on leave tomorrow, we will do the block and procure a few curios, photos etc…

Monday, 21/12/14. This morning we paraded as usual, and were all very pleased when our dear old Colonel told us he was exceptionally pleased with the way we behaved yesterday at the procession; also he granted us a day’s leave to-day which of course made us all smile, and we had a day in Cairo. Rich and I rode donkeys half way and then caught a tram, you would have laughed had you seen us on the donkeys. We made beasts of ourselves in Cairo. We had two helpings of steak, fried potatoes, broad beans, two rolls of bread and beautiful date jam, tea etc. We visited a general store kept by a Greek. It was very interesting, there was an interpreter there and we had a long conversation.

We saw 15 different kinds of cheese, Egyptian cheese is pure white, not at all pleasant to taste. Whilst we were talking a chap came in, quite a young fellow, he could speak English, and he said he was a butter manufacturer. He asked us to see his factory which we did and were much amused. The educated Egyptian is a very refined gentleman and all like to converse with us and show us around; the Egyptian lady is exceptionally sweet.”

6/2/1915

3rd Battalion AIF

3rd Battalion AIF

EXPERIMENTAL FARM – Messrs R. Heffernan and Sons have very kindly supplied us with the four samples of potatoes grown on their Experimental Farm at Yarragee, which are “Satisfaction,” “Early Manistee,” “Manhatten” and “Up-to-Date.” Each variety is of large size and a decided credit to the farm. When we have sampled the lot in the pot we will give our opinion as to the best variety for the table. 6/2/1915

Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 2.28.40 pmCIRCUS – On Monday evening, Miss Kemp and Raphael’s circus and buckjumping show opened to a good house. The circus includes some novel and clever turns. A couple of bucking cows produced amusement, while among the horses a substantial reward is offered to the rider who can sit Ding Dong. This horse is a marvel, and can do anything within reason, including telling the time by a watch, adding up figures and dividing the total by a small number, and many other feats…. 6/2/1915

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

The opening of the Kiora Bridge in 1890

‘Kiora Kith and Kin’ by Shirley Jurmann

The latest publication by the Moruya and District Historical Society is the wonderful book Kiora Kith and Kin, written by Shirley Jurmann.

Kiora Kith and Kin is the story of European settlement of the Kiora, Wamban and Mungerarie areas near Moruya on the south coast of NSW, Australia, and the pioneer families who lived there.

Shirley is a member of our society and it was with great pleasure that I asked her the following question. Shirley’s detailed answers demonstrate her not only her passion for the history of this beautiful area but also the collaborative nature of the writing process.

This book is on sale through the museum for the extremely reasonable price of $20. For details of the book’s contents click here.

The author as a very young visitor to Kiora with a Luck Street neighbour, Joyce Berriman.

BH: Before we discuss your book Kiora Kith and Kin, what does the district Kiora mean to you?
SJ: Kiora has always been a special place for me. My father’s family were not pioneer settlers but have had a close association with the place since the 1860s when my great grandfather Joseph Louttit started taking his boat up the river to collect the farmers’ produce to take to the Sydney markets. Early in the 1900s my grandfather Sid Louttit farmed there on one of the Collett farms. Later my Uncle Jack Louttit bought the original Collett homestead and had a market garden there. Other relatives also farmed at Kiora. My father, his brothers and one of his sisters attended the Kiora school. When I was a small child we often went for Sunday drives to visit my uncle, aunt and cousin.

BH: What inspired you to write your book Kiora Kith and Kin?
SJ: At the wake after my father’s funeral in 1972 I was given a copy of a Kiora school photo. In the photo were my father Roly Louttit and his brothers Jack and Vic. The names of all the children were on the back. A few years ago I looked at this photo again and began to wonder who these children were. I began to try to trace them. Who were their parents? What became of these children? Who did they marry? Did they stay in the Moruya/Kiora area or move on to perceived greener pastures? With the help of the Moruya and District Pioneer Registers, put out by the MDHS, and the NSW Births, Deaths and Marriage records, I was able to find that all of these children, except for the teacher’s family, were born in the area as had their parents and even some of their grandparents. They were all from long term Moruya/Kiora families. Some stayed, some moved on, some married locally born people. My interest in the families and area grew. I mentioned to Wendy Simes that I wouldn’t mind putting something together on Kiora for the MDHS. She seemed to think it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

BH: Where were you able to find your fascinating source material?
SJ: I began by going through as many books on the Moruya area as I could and extracting any mention of Kiora. I found out what I could about John Hawdon, first settler, the establishment of the Kiora Estate and Kiora House, the convicts, other settlers, the trials of floods, droughts, bushfires, tragedies. Wendy fed me information held by the MDHS including lists of convicts, people who had lived there, burials in the Kiora cemetery, photos, Phyllis Stiskin’s notes on the Kiora school. She arranged a meeting for me with Huw Owen-Jones, the present owner of Kiora House.

I combed through the Pioneer Directories for any reference to people living at Kiora. I knew several people who lived or had lived, at Kiora. I contacted everyone I could think of. They were all helpful. John Clarke wrote me a piece on his memories of who lived where in the 1940s-50s and provided some photos. Brian Clarke provided information and photos of the property “Jilambra”, originally part of the Hawdon Estate. Huw Owen-Jones allowed me to take photos of Kiora House and showed me paintings of Agnes Josephine Hawdon who died aged 4 in 1864. and of Kiora House when it was derelict. He showed me where Annie Hawdon had scratched her name and the date into a window pane with her diamond engagement ring, on the occasion of her 21st birthday and engagement party in 1865. It is still quite clearly visible.

The Hawdon family of Kiora

The Emmott and Hawdon families Correction: This is a photo of the Emmott family of Moruya dated 1887. Fortunately there are some Hawdons in the photo. Ernest Hawdon is back row on the right. His wife Elizabeth Hawdon nee Emmott is below him on the 2nd back row and their children Margaret, Werge, Ernie, John and Leslie are in the photo as well.

I contacted Sue Knight nee Collett to ask if she had any early Collett photos. She didn’t but referred me to Linda Robertson nee Collett. Surprise! She lived only about 20 minutes from me. I went to visit her and she was most helpful with information, photos and a photocopy of Caroline Collett’s 1916 Diary. My cousin Jennie Burgess nee Louttit, now in her 80s had lived as a child at Mungerarie House, the old Collett home built in the late 1850s. She was able to give me a description of the house and rooms. One memory she is not fond of was the 30 feet long hallway up the middle of the house which her house-proud mother insisted she polish every week on her hands and knees when she was only about 12.

John Tranter whose father started the Moruya Cordial factory in the old cheese factory shared some memories. Jenny Pollock nee Evans, a Hawdon descendant, shared some photos. At the MDHS one day I met by accident Damien Rodgers whose parents had done some of the restoration work on Kiora House. He told of a drawing done by convicts of the ship on which they came to Australia. It had accidently been painted over when renovations were being done. He spoke of seeing a ghost at the end of his bed one night. Presents owners have not seen any ghosts!

Bruce Coppin spoke of being one of the first on the scene of an accident in 1966. Eileen Irwin was driving across the Kiora Bridge when she lost control of the car. It hit the side and plunged into the water. The rescuers were able to pull her from the car but her daughter Karen aged 4 was not so lucky. It was the time before compulsory seatbelts. When the car turned over the small child was thrown under the dashboard where she became jammed. She was not found until it was too late and she drowned.

Debbie Bruen provided a photo of her 1990 wedding at Kiora House. It was fitting that she married there as she was descended from the Jeffery family who were early settlers to the area, Kathy Smith provided a photo of the original Kiora school and of her ancestor Daniel Green who was headmaster there. At first it seemed doubtful that Kiora had had such a school but in Phyllis Stiskin’s notes on the KIora school were the plans of just such a building. I found information on the internet about assisted immigrants.

The 100 year booklets put out by the MDHS provided newspaper reports of happenings to do with Kiora and I found other bits and pieces in old newspapers including my parents’ paper “The Moruya Advertiser”. Dawn Daken was an absolute treasure. She drove my sister-in-law Ruth and me around Kiora, showing us where everything was or had been. She showed us through the old church now converted into a cottage but with signs of the old church still visible, including an arched window and the interior churchlike ceiling. I had another accidental meeting of interest.

A couple of years ago I was returning from Moruya. I usually catch the bus to Sydney, spend a few hours there and catch the bus north to Port Macquarie. I was sitting in the waiting room and got chatting to the lady beside me. I mentioned that I was returning from Moruya. She said her mother grew up in Moruya. I asked the name and she said “Dulcie Shumack”. I immediately said “As in Kiora school teacher?” She was amazed that I knew the name as the family had been gone from the area by 1930. We exchanged bits of information.

BH: Do you have special or personal memories of an earlier Kiora?

Shirley Jurmann

SJ: My personal memories include visiting relatives and stories told by my father. As children we sometimes rode our bicycles out to the bridge. We even had some school swimming lessons there in the days before Moruya had a pool. Kiora House was derelict at that time and there were stories of it being haunted by convicts rattling chains! The Kiora school was closed and moved into Moruya. It was still there when I attended school there so I spent a couple of years of my schooling in the same room where my father had gone to school.

Another favourite anecdote would have to be the one about Annie Hawdon and her scratching her name and date into the window pane f Kiora House, and it is still there 150 years later! Picture the scene, very much like the attached parlour scene picture of the same year. The previous year would have been a sad one for the family with little Agnes Josephine, daughter of Annie’s brother William, dying at the age of 4 from diphtheria. Now was a chance to celebrate new happiness.

A typical parlour at the time that Ann Howdon

A typical parlour at the time that Ann Hawdon scratched her name and the date into the window pane

BH: You talk of many of the early settlers of the Kiora district. Did you have any favourite anecdotes about any of the early characters/settlers of the area?
SJ: One thing that really saddened me was reading about the early deaths of so many small children.

A favourite anecdote would have to be the one about Annie Hawdon and her scratching her name and date into the window pane, and it is still there 150 years later! The previous year would have been a sad one for the family with little Agnes Josephine, daughter of Annie’s brother William, dying at the age of 4 from diphtheria. Now was a chance to celebrate new happiness.

I was impressed by the restoration of “Jilambra” by Brian and Marylyn Clarke and the work done by various people to restore Kiora House.

BH: When doing your research did you discover any surprising facts about Kiora – the place or its people?
SJ: I knew Kiora had been much more closely populated than it is today but I was really surprised that at the time Moruya was declared a town in the 1850s Kiora was competing with Moruya in its rate of progress and expansion.

BH: Your book goes into detail about some of the surprising buildings businesses that were part of the thriving Kiora community. Do you have a favourite building out of the remaining structures?
SJ: Kiora House and Jilambra would have to be my favourite buildings. Their faithful restorations are wonderful to see and a credit to the people who did them.

Kiora House

Kiora House

BH What was the hardest part of putting your research into its current format?
SJ: I was continually writing, rewriting, adding, subtracting, refining and polishing as I went along. Just when I thought I had finished something else interesting would turn up. Eventually I thought I had put together enough. I sent it off to Wendy. She did a great job of editing, rearranging and regrouping items with a common theme and providing an index.

BH: Why did you choose to give your book the title Kiora Kith and Kin?
SJ: I wanted the book to be something more than an account of historical facts, more like a family history with anecdotes about families, how they came to the area and what they did. “Kith and Kin’’’ seemed to fit in with that idea and of course the “Ks” fitted in with Kiora! I am always looking for quirky titles to things I write!

BH Kiora has had a fascinating past. What do you think that the future has in store for Kiora?
SJ: I doubt that Kiora will ever see anything like its past. It is today a beautiful rural area with smaller holdings, a pleasant place to live, with lovely views and I hope it will always stay that way.

BH: Finally, what will be the topic of your next book or article?
SJ: I have written books on my mother’s and my father’s families. I enjoy researching my children-in-law’s families (they have some fascinating ancestors!). I have written several articles for the MDHS Journal and am at present working on one on Thalia Parbery whose husband drowned in the Moruya River in 1855. I would love to do anything on Moruya but I doubt that I could find anything as interesting as Kiora or with such a lot of information available.

The opening of the Kiora Bridge in 1890

The opening of the Kiora Bridge

Kiora Bridge today

Kiora Bridge today

The Kiora district today

The Kiora district today

George Chewings Shop

Queen Street (the main street of Moruya) and other news from 100 years ago.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

Screen Shot 2015-01-08 at 1.22.54 pmDROWNING – A very sad drowning fatality occurred at Narooma on Sunday morning, when Miss Lua Rosalie Hollingdale, aged 18 years, a visitor from Sydney, met her death. Mrs. Hollingdale, accompanied by her two daughters and son, arrived at Narooma on Saturday afternoon and put up at Scantlebury’s Boarding House.

On Sunday morning the two girls and their brother went in their Car to a small lake (really an arm of the sea) about a quarter of a mile from Narooma, to bathe. They had donned their bathing attire and were ready to enter the water when a bull rushed down to the beach and commenced tearing up the sand with his hoofs. The bathers became alarmed and rushed into the water for safety, but went out of their depth and got into difficulties. The brother managed to rescue the younger sister, but the elder girl sank, and the spot where she went down could not be located.

The alarm was given, and in a short time several went to the spot, but it was threequarters of an hour before Mr. Thomsen located the body and recovered it. Efforts at resuscitation proved unsuccessful… 30/1/1915

STREETS AND ROADS – We have again been asked by a number of our most progressive Citizens to invite the special attention of the Shire Council to the very bad state of repair in which Moruya’s main street, Queen St., is in at the present time, also the main road to Bateman’s Bay near the top of Polwamre. We have written and re written about the rough condition in which this particular portion of our main South Coast road has been allowed to remain for many years past, but the “powers that be” appear to turn a deaf ear to our pleadings in the public interest. Queen St, we commend to Councillor Flood and the Polwamra abortion to Crs. Mallon and Milne in whose riding it exists. 30/1/1915

George Chewings Shop

George Chewying’s shop in Queen Street, Moruya. While the photo was taken after 1915 the street hadn’t been improved much!

 

Screen Shot 2015-01-29 at 10.33.34 pmPIANO TUNING – Mr. C.A. Bowring, the well-known and high-class piano tuner, who is now at Coxon’s Hotel, will visit Bodalla, Narooma and Tilba early next week. 30/1/1915

BATEMAN’S BAY PUNT – On Tuesday last the new motor-power punt, built by Mr. Turnbull for Bateman’s Bay ferry service, was hitched onto the wire ropes, and by 2.40 p.m. was running to the entire satisfaction of the builder and all concerned. The Government Inspector arrived the same night to take over the punt. Without doubt the new structure will be found an immense improvement on the obsolete conveyance. Mr. Turnbull was complimented on all sides on the up-to-date and faithful construction of the new motor punt, which only occupies 3 minutes and 5 seconds in travelling from side to side… 30/1/1915

ANNUAL RACES – Since the establishment of the Moruya Registered Race Club, some 35 years ago, there has never been anything approaching the large number of horses nominated for the principal events as has been made this year. To make things better all the horses entered, with the exception of two, have arrived, together with others intended for the open races. We congratulate the management, especially the courteous Secretary (Mr. F. Flanagan) on the record entry and bright prospects of a record attendance. 30/1/1915

The grandstand at the old Moruya Racecourse )( now the Moruya Showground)

The grandstand at the old Moruya Racecourse ( now the Moruya Showground)

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

This statue in the Western Front section of the gallery is particularly evocative.

The Australian War Memorial’s New World War 1 Gallery

This must -see exhibition at the Australian War Memorial presents the story of Australia in the First World War chronologically, covering all major theatres of operations: Gallipoli; the Western Front; Sinai and Palestine; and the war at sea. The events taking place on the home front and the immediate and enduring legacy of the war are also included.

The Memorial holds one of the world’s great collections of material related to the First World War. The First World War Galleries integrate a wide variety of items from this collection, including dioramas and other works of art; uniforms; medals; technology such as artillery and firearms; photographs; film; and personal items such as letters and diaries.

Since the opening of the Memorial in 1941 the First World War Galleries have undergone several major alterations and many smaller updates. The new state-of-the-art galleries now occupy the entire west wing of the Memorial’s ground level.

The story of the First World War has been returned to a chronological presentation commencing in 1914 and concluding with the immediate and enduring legacies of the conflict.

An early recruitment poster

An early recruitment poster

Information is clearly and effectively displayed

Information is clearly and effectively displayed

Faces of war - the full quote in this image is really worth reading and thinking about. The way the museum has used these

Faces of war – the full quote in this image is really worth reading and thinking about. The way the museum has used these images is extremely effective.

Many photos have been digitised and are used very effectively in the exhibition. They appear both in original form and as part of a touch screen display.

Many photos have been digitised and are used very effectively in the exhibition. They appear both in original form and as part of a touch screen display.

Simply touch the icon of the photo that you want to research and an enlarged version of the image and accompanying information appear on the larger screen. The image can be further enlarged.

Simply touch the icon of the photo that you want to research and an enlarged version of the image and accompanying information appear on the larger screen. The image can be further enlarged.

Lone Pine- one of the Australian War Memorial's iconic dioramas

Lone Pine- one of the Australian War Memorial’s iconic dioramas

The Dioramas: Counted among the greatest treasures of the Memorial, the First World War dioramas were constructed in the 1920s. The idea for the dioramas came from discussions during the First World War between Charles Bean, one of the Memorial’s founders, and a group of war artists and others. Bean wanted the dioramas to be more than simply battlefield models. He saw them as works of art, a way of helping people in Australia to understand the devastation and danger of battle, and the sacrifice and sufferings of the people to whom the Memorial is dedicated.

The iconic dioramas offer the viewer a frozen moment in time, placing the battle in a geographic setting and against a human scale. They remain as an integral part of the new galleries. Some of the Memorial’s original dioramas no longer exist, having been damaged or removed during earlier building renovations when they were considered to be merely exhibition displays rather than works of art. Today, 13 First World War dioramas are held in the National Collection. Ten of these dioramas are displayed in the new exhibition, including two desert campaign dioramas – Semakh and Desert Patrol – which have not been publically displayed since the 1980s.

To discover fascinating insights into the conservation of these dioramas click here.

On a personal note, I have taken many school groups through the AWM and no matter the interest level,  the dioramas always had a great impact upon the students.

The Galleries

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The entrance to the gallery

The Story of ANZAC Cove

There is nothing for it but to dig yourselves right in and stick it out. Make a personal appeal to your men to make a supreme effort to hold their ground.

Sir Ian Hamilton
General Officer Commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force
26 April 1915

The Lone Pine diorama

The Lone Pine diorama depicts the first diversionary attacks in the advance to Chunuck Bair at dusk on 6 August 1915. The diorama shows men of the 1st Australian Infantry Brigade attacking Turkish trenches. The Australians are wearing white patches to prevent them being fired on by their own men.

An amazing, interactive map of the Dardarnelles

An amazing, interactive map of the Dardarnelles

More detail from the interactive map

More detail from the interactive map

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Supplying the troops

Supplying the army. The original artefacts are used to great effect.

The Sinai and Palestine Gallery

The entrance to the Middle Easr section of the gallery

The entrance to the Sinai and Palestine section of the gallery

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The Desert Patrol diorama depicts a light horse patrol in the Sinai desert

The Transportation of Supplies 1914–18, Palestine series comprises nine dioramas depicting the transportation of supplies in the desert campaign of Palestine in 1916. Work began on the series in 1926. It was first displayed at the Memorial in the Palestine gallery, where it remains. The next two dioramas are fro the Transportation series.

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After the darkness comes the dawn: This diorama depicts a supply train travelling across the sand dunes toward Beersheba in the light of false dawn.

The long trek ends The diorama depicts a handful of light horsemen preparing a meal in the shadow of a battle-scarred mosque. Their mounts are tethered under a clump of palms in the background.

The long trek ends
The diorama depicts a handful of light horsemen preparing a meal in the shadow of a battle-scarred mosque. Their mounts are tethered under a clump of palms in the background.

The Western Front

1917 was a dreadful year for our forces - well illustrated in this new gallery

1917 was a dreadful year for our forces – well illustrated in this new gallery

The Bullecourt diorama

Bullecourt, 1917 depicts the 46th Battalion, lead by Major Percy Black, fighting the first line of German trenches at Bullecourt on 11 April 1917.

This statue in the Western Front section of the gallery is particularly evocative.

This statue in the Western Front section of the gallery is particularly evocative.

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Somme Winter, 1916–17 depicts a trench located west of Gueudecourt. It shows the grim conditions Australians fought and lived in. The small funk hole, roofed by duckboard and covered with a waterproof sheet, is where the men mostly slept during winter.

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The Somme Winter 1916-1917 diorama was previously referred to as Gueudecourt and Life in the trenches at Guedecourt, Somme 1916–17.

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The Desert Patrol diorama depicts a light horse patrol in the Sinai desert

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The Battle of Dernancourt (France, April 1918) diorama

The Battle of Hamel (July1918) was a real turning point in the war.

The Battle of Hamel ( France, July 1918) was a real turning point in the war.

The Mont St Quentin diorama depicts a scene during the 6th Brigade's attack on Mont St Quentin on 1 September 1918. Work began on Mont St Quentin, 1918 in 1920. It was the first diorama completed for the Memorial and previously referred to as Storming of Mont St Quentin

The Mont St Quentin diorama depicts a scene during the 6th Brigade’s attack on Mont St Quentin on 1 September 1918. Work began on Mont St Quentin, 1918 in 1920. It was the first diorama completed for the Memorial and previously referred to as Storming of Mont St Quentin

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The Mont St Quentin Cross : On 3 September 1918, 11 men of the 21st Battalion killed in the storming of Mont St Quentin were buried by their comrades in a shell crater, and a memorial cross was erected over the grave.

Semakh depicts the events of 25 September 1918 when the 11th Light Horse Regiment attacked the village of Semakh, in Palestine.  Its inclusion in the galleries is of particular importance as recent research into indigenous service has revealed that the 11th Light Horse Regiment had the largest known group of indigenous Australians in one AIF unit

Semakh depicts the events of 25 September 1918 when the 11th Light Horse Regiment attacked the village of Semakh, in Palestine. Its inclusion in the galleries is of particular importance as recent research into indigenous service has revealed that the 11th Light Horse Regiment had the largest known group of indigenous Australians in one AIF unit

Legacies of War

We came back to a changed world. The world was now going through the upheaval from war to peace, from insanity to sanity – a greater upheaval than from peace to war.

Captain Garnet Adcock
2nd Tunnelling Company

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Farms along the Araluen Road

‘Why Don’t You Volunteer?’ – News from the Moruya Examiner of 1915

Blog_Jan14HeaderShire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

STOCK RETURNS – Mr. Stock Inspector Mater has been in town during the week examining the stock returns, with the result that he finds no less than 112 owners have failed to make returns. Mr. Mater has kindly supplied us with the following figures showing the number of stock returned and the estimated number not returned, viz.: Returned – horses 2476, cattle 20845, sheep 2616; estimated not returned – horses 448, cattle 4196, sheep 1063; total – horses 2925, cattle 25041, sheep 3679. These figures show an increase in horses of 90, a decrease in cattle of 408 and a decrease in sheep of 29. We are informed that legal proceedings will at once be taken against defaulters. We would therefore strongly urge upon those who have left themselves liable, probably through an oversight, to rush in their returns, and their neglect may, possibly, be overlooked by the authorities. 23/1/1915

Farms along the Araluen Road

Farms along the Araluen Road

EVERYTHING is going up by leaps and bounds for the farmer and grazier, produce of all kinds is bringing phenomenal prices and the high price of butcher’s meat is causing considerable concern to Sydney people. 23/1/1915

NERRIGUNDAH (From our Correspondent) – On Friday, the 13th inst., a grand farewell social was held in the School of Arts, as a send-off to three of our local men – G. Thomas, A. Waters, and A. Coleman, who have volunteered their services for the honor of our flag at the front. The hall was tastefully decorated with flags and rifles, the Union Jack and flags of the Allies being placed in prominent positions. Patriotic speeches were given by Messrs. J. Jessop (chairman), D. Fraser, W.E. Guest and J. Pollock… 23/1/1915

The Nerrigundah Roll of Honour. The names of two residents mentioned in the article above would be on this board - now found in the Bodalla Hall

The Nerrigundah Roll of Honour – now found in the Bodalla Hall. A. Waters’ ( mentioned above) name is on this board.

WHY DON’T YOU VOLUNTEER?
(By “Merriang,” in the “Stock and Station Journal.”)

There are thousands in Australia who say that they’ll defend
If the Germans come towards us just at the bitter end;
But if the Kaiser William suppressed the British, so
His ships were free to reach us, Australia then would know
Their talk of late defences would simply useless be,
And that careless laggard had missed a victory.

We’ve a million men, all stalwart, beneath the Southern Cross
Who should enlist for service, to ease the Empire’s loss
Of noble fighting Britons, now facing fearful stress,
The while our sons are idly boasting merits numberless,
We are sending forth our thousands, with smugly vainful boast
That we’re ‘helping out the Allies’ to Europe’s winning post.

Such efforts, though, are feeble, despite our ringing cheers
For the little band Australia sends forth as volunteers.
Oh! All you sons of Britain, transplanted in this land,
How can you feel contented? Oh! Don’t you understand
They menace British freedom and British old fairplay –
These creatures of the Kaiser, who are drinking to “The Day?”

You’ve a birthright, true Australians, you have something to uphold
To prove the blood within you in peace has not grown cold,
Never mind your “hopes in business,” never heed the seeming cost;
If die you must, die bravely, before the cause is lost.
You boast you’ve God’s own country, you’ve boasted and you’ve cheered,
Be dumb, and hide your face now, unless you’ve volunteered.

You claim a White Australia; you’re always talking fight –
You swear no colored races will mingle with the white,
And yet you cheer the Hindoo, who fights with the Allies,
And screams his cheers for Britain and with the British dies.
While you, who bar his color, are standing idly by
To let him do the fighting. Why don’t you go and try

To prove that you’re Australian, so you, when ends the war,
May hold your head up proudly, as your fathers did before?
Oh, what’s the use of talking, while your haggard brothers go to fight
Against the German millions, whose only thought is might?
Don’t dare to raise your heads, boys, don’t say that you’ve no fear
Why don’t you prove you’re British? WHY DON’T YOU VOLUNTEER?

A World War 1 recruitment poster on display at the Australian War Memorial

A World War 1 recruitment poster on display at the Australian War Memorial

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

A new book entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann, is also now available from the Society for $20.

Vulcan St looking Sth

Enlistments, Hotel Windows, a Death and a Sale – News from 100 years ago

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

TO THE FRONT – Mr. D.A.B. Pollock, solicitor, who has been on a visit to Nerrigundah, informs us that two of its residents have left for Sydney to enlist for the war, and that four others had visited Bodalla with a view of obtaining medical certificates of fitness for the front. Now, Moruya, isn’t it up to you to send a few more volunteers? 16/1/1915

The Nerrigundah Roll of Honour. The names of two residents mentioned in the article above would be on this board - now found in the Bodalla Hall

The Nerrigundah Roll of Honour. The names of two residents mentioned in the article above would be on this board – now found in the Bodalla Hall

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The advertisement for the sale in one of the  local papers ( from Trove)

VERY IMPORTANT SALE – Special attention is invited to the announcement appearing in this issue of Mr. A. Millikin’s sale of his private residence and business premises in Church Street. The residence is without doubt one of the best in the town or district. It has eleven large airy rooms with a spacious hall, all lofty and pine lined throughout, all requisite out buildings with water laid on in the kitchen, laundery and bath-room, and in every detail is provided with conveniences for the comfort of the most fastidious occupier. The allotment upon which the residence stands contain ½ an acre with a double frontage, having a width of 60 feet fronting Church St. and a similar area overlooking the town esplanade and Moruya River, the situation being healthy and convenient. Persons desirous of purchasing this lovely residence are requested to make immediate application to the auctioneer, R.H. Harvison. We need hardly make special mention of the business premises as the name of “A. Millikin’s coach and buggy factory” is so popular and widely known throughout the whole State. Such a splendid business as this should be snapped up at once. 16/1/1915

OUR RIVER – Owing to representations made by the Eurobodalla Shire Council, the dredge Tau, which was being dismantled in order to be taken round to Narooma, has been ordered to continue dredging for another month in order to deepen the shallow part of our river where the s.s. Bodalla got fast the week before last. 16/1/1915

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‘Kiora – the residence of Mr William Hawdon

OBITUARY – Before going to press yesterday (Friday), we received word of the death of Mr. William Hawdon, at his residence, Kiora. The deceased gentleman had suffered great agony on and off for the past 40 years from rheumatism, and for many years had been confined to his home. He leaves one brother, Francis, of Coila, and one sister, Mrs. Wilson, mother of Mr. Athol Wilson, of this town. Nurse Ethel Emmott was in attendance since Tuesday. Deceased’s age was, we are informed, 83 years. 16/1/1915

An advertisement of the time. Keating’s Hotel may have stocked this beer.

HOTEL ALTERATIONS – Moruya publicans are greatly incensed through the drastic enforcement of the Licensing Act by the powers that be. The latest orders are that the licensee must insert additional ventilators in his hotel rooms, and have the windows to open from the top and bottom on rollers. The carrying out of the last-named order will not increase the architectural beauty of the hotel, neither will it add to the present fresh air capacity of some of them. Take for instance Keating’s fine spacious hotel with its extra large and airy front windows which open from top and bottom alike, and which for the simple reason that they don’t run on rollers the proprietor is compelled to expend a large sum of money in having them pulled down and re-erected. 16/1/1915

Keating's Hotel, 1920

Keating’s Hotel, 1920 – hopefully with the rollers installed

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

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Picnics, a letter home from the Great War and a drunkard

Blog_Jan14HeaderShire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

XMAS – Xmas of 1914 passed off very quietly in this district, the majority of residents observing the old custom of gathering their families around their own festive board for the Xmas pudding. Boxing Day was spent by the majority in picknicing near the sea beach, some amusing themselves by fishing off the breakwater, others in the river, while a certain percentage passed the time away in the breakers and strolling on the sand. About 100 of the picknicers were taken down the river by Mr. Weatherby’s oil launch. 2/1/1915

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COURT OF PETTY SESSIONS – Before the P.M. a local lad, found drunk, was fined 2s 6d and costs or three days. Fine paid. 2/1/1915

Moruya Court House

Moruya Court House

“OUR BOYS” – Mr. Leo DeSaxe, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. C. DeSaxe, of this town, and who is with the Expeditionary Force in Egypt, writing home on the 23rd Nov. says:

“Up to now I have had excellent health, the heat in the tropics does not seem to affect me in the least. If we had ordered the weather we could not have had it calmer, not had a rough day since we started. We stayed four days in Albany, but only anchored in the Sound which is composed of a few islands, and is an excellent harbor. I wish you could see the fleet, it is a magnificent sight 48 vessels bowling along as smooth as a swan.

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This photo was taken not long after the letter was written. Leo de Saxe is the second soldier from the right.

We were a fortnight crossing the Indian Ocean. It is a long time to go without seeing land. In one of my letters I mentioned the encounter between the Emden and Sydney, but in case you did not receive it I will tell you about it. The Sydney was one of our escort when she got the S.O.S. message from the wireless station at Cocos Island. We were only three miles away at the time, and in a very short time she was engaging the German. In two hours she had the Emden beached and beaten, so you will see it is a glorious victory. There were 1800 rounds fired between the 2 boats. The first shot of the Sydney blew the Emden’s funnels and a mast away. There was great rejoicing on board when the wireless came through.

On the 15th we got to Colombo. For miles before we came near the port the sea was alive with natives in their catamarans. They are quaint things, you wonder how they keep up in them. On the 16th we went into the port, artificial one made of huge breakwaters. The natives here amused me very much with their dealing and diving for pennies. If they ask a 1/- for a thing one wants to give them about 2d. They are terrible liars. We got some nice fruit there.

On the evening of the 17th we sailed for Aden which we expect to reach tomorrow; I think we are going to coal there. This morning we passed the Soidtra Islands, they are barren islands North of Africa there is an active volcano there. The flying fish in these waters are like a lot of swallows flying everywhere.”

Leo de Saxe
2/1/1915

Leo de Saxe looking back at the photo taken of him when he was a young soldier in Egypt in 1915 - a long way from Moruya!

Leo de Saxe looking back at the photo taken of him when he was a young soldier in Egypt in 1915 – a long way from Moruya!

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Broulee

Broulee, Woodchops, Patriotic Sports and Stock Sales – one hundred years ago.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:
WOODCHOP – Axemen are reminded that nominations for Mr. P. Bill’s Boxing Day £10 woodchop close on Monday next, 21st inst. 19/12/1914

SCHOOL BREAK-UP – The Convent School children dispersed for the Christmas holidays yesterday. After a brief but interesting concert from the little ones the prizes were distributed by Father Cassidy. The children were then regaled at a tea party on the grounds. Excitement was caused by the boys challenging the girls to a game of rounders. The match was highly contested for two hours and resulted in a glorious victory for the girls. A prize was given, donated by the priests to the winning team. 19/12/1914

A sale two weeks later - the same sellers at the Moruya Sale Yards

A sale two weeks later – the same sellers at the Moruya Sale Yards. The Shoalhaven News and South Coast Districts Advertiser, Saturday 9 January 1915.

SUCCESSFUL STOCK SALE – Harvison and Thomson’s stock sale held in Moruya on Wednesday on account of Mr. Cecil Keating, our Far South Coast leviathan stock dealer, established another record for the district, by clearing every hoof yarded at prices which not only astonished the natives but surprised the very oldest residents.

Fat bullocks sold to £12, fat cows to £9, store cows to £4, 13 springing heifers to £7 6s, poddy steers to £2 15s, and a yard of stags brought £6 7s per head, whilst sheep sold at 18s and lambs at 16s. Other lines brought proportionately high prices. The principal buyers came from Jamberoo, Nowra, Nowra Hill, Araluen and Milton, whilst the heaviest local buyers were Messrs. Leslie Hawdon, Will Ryan, Martin McMahon, Harry McIntosh, W. Smith, H.J. Thomson and Karl Thomson (Mogo). 19/12/1914

CAMPING AT THE HEADS – During the Xmas holidays Broulee beach might be well termed Canvas Town, as the popularity of that place for camping is becoming greater each year. This Christmas, however, quite a large number of tents were to be seen pitched along the beach, and most conspicuous was those under the “Lotophagi” banner, who regularly, twice a year, patronise the Heads in this manner. When visited by a representative of this office he found them all very comfortable and happy, with the exception of one or two who were suffering from sunburn and others who had not quite got over their previous night’s experience in the thunderstorm. Another member who could not be found, had been having a strenuous time of it all day answering the numerous applications to their advertisement (Cook wanted, Young and pretty preferred), but it was ascertained by his mates that his labors had been rewarded. After hearing many extraordinary fish yarns etc., this scribe left with the idea that camping at the Heads was not a bad one at all, while many of the company were beginning to growl that the new cook had not returned to get the tea. 2/1/1915

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Camping at Broulee Reserve, 1924 (William Massey, his wife Lucy and their daughters Joan and Pat).

 

NAROOMA – A BIG DAY’S Patriotic Sports will be held at Narooma, The Brighton of The South, on Friday January 1st, 1915. 19/12/1914

Sports Days and Picnic Days were popular community events of the time. This photo is of a picnic Day at Dwyers Creek in 1910.

Sports Days and Picnic Days were popular community events of the time. This photo is of a picnic Day at Dwyers Creek in 1910. It would be wonderful to be able to identify any of the people in the photo.

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

The Illawarra Steamship Co became the main shipping company on the south east coast.

The annual school concert – 1914 style.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

CONVENT SCHOOL CONCERT – “Nothing succeeds like success,” and success succeeding success is following the efforts of the good Sisters in their work in preparing the children for the annual school concert. The performance on Friday night last was one of the best we have attended, and the immense audience assembled in the Mechanics’ Hall fully demonstrated their appreciation of every item. The proceedings opened with a chorus “Welcome” by the Senior girls and was warmly applauded. The patriotic song “Faithful to our Motherland” (words and music by Father Consadine formerly of Braidwood) by Masters J., R., P. and E. Heffernan, F. and W. Constable, J. McKeon, Green, Chewying, Rootsey, Corrigan, McCauley and Quilter, was well rendered and enthusiastically received.

This was immediately followed by the flag drill, excellently executed by the same boys….”Night, lovely night” sweetly and harmoniously sung…preceded physical culture exercises by the same young ladies. This item produced one of the most beautiful spectacular effects of the evening. The pretty performers, who were attired in flowing robes of blue which glistened with representations of the various orbs of the celestial sphere, gracefully and with marked precision went through the numerous intricate movements…

After an interval of ten minutes a fitting finale to the evening’s scenes of grandeur was staged, the performance being styled “The Nation’s Quarrel.” The various Nations were represented as follows: – Mother Earth, Monie Ryan; Holland, M. Constable; England, V. Corrigan; Scotland, J. Quilter; Japan, Mildred Ryan; France, M. Heffernan; Italy, F. Constable; Russia. V. Rootsey; Egypt, P. Heffernan; Switzerland, S. Rankin; Germany, J. Battel; America (Uncle Sam), F. McCauley; Neptune (Father Sea), Miss Johnson; Ireland, K. McCauley; Australia, K. Brogan; Australian Aboriginal, W. Constable; China, J. Heffernan; Africa, Victor Corrigan; Turkey, E. Heffernan; Spain, M. Brogan; Iceland, J. McKeon; India, R. Heffernan. Each child cleverly rendered a song and dance symbolic of the nations represented… 19/12/1914

BATEMAN’S BAY (From our Correspondent) – …It is currently reported here that the very popular firm of McMillan Bros. is about to enter into the weekly shipping trade to this port, if so it should command a big support, as the members are widely known on the South Coast. It is understood that the ever popular Alf Duffy is to be their agent at the Bay. A better choice could not be made as nothing is a trouble to Alf. 19/12/1914

The Illawarra Steamship Co became the main shipping company on the south east coast.

The Illawarra & South Coast Steamship Navigation Co. Ltd. was the main shipping company on the south east coast. Newcomers such as the proposed McMillan Bros found it almost impossible to compete. This image is of the old shed on the main road at Batemans Bay. Alterations to the shed were carried out by MJ Dunne in 1913.

FLAGS! FLAGS!! Of the Allies at Weatherby’s. 19/12/1914

David Lloyd George. Atthe outbreak of the First World War, Lloyd George served as minister for munitions and as secretary for war.

HISTORIC UTTERANCE – One of the speeches which will go down to history is that delivered by the chancellor of the Exchequer, the Rt. Hon. D. Lloyd George, at the Queen’s Hall, London, when he dealt with the question of national honour. A full text of the speech has been reprinted in pamphlet form, and we have received several copies from Messrs. Gordon and Gotch, Sydney, Ltd., which we will be pleased to distribute to applicants. 19/12/1914

MISS ISABEL PETERSEN, collector for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institution was in town on Tuesday. The collector’s charming personality should materially tend to increase the Institution’s exchequer this year. 19/12/1914

Miss Petersen worked as an Official Collector for the NSW Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute in Darligtom

Miss Petersen worked as an Official Collector for the NSW Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute in Darligtom

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).