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Sergeant David Samuel Anderson – Son, Brother, Mate and Soldier

On this year’s centenary of Anzac Day we pause to remember the men and women who left Australia and sailed to far off lands. They were probably filled with a mixture of hope, adventure, uncertainty, bravery and fear.

Many of these men and women never returned to Australia. We know of these men and women; but we don’t often get the chance to know them

Too often we only know these brave men and women as names on a cenotaph or an honour roll. Sometimes we are able to put names to beautiful sepia images of soldiers in their smart uniforms that were taken before they embarked for the battlefields of Egypt, Palestine, Gallipoli and the Western Front.

Sargt. David Anderson

Sargt. David Anderson

Now, thanks to modern technology, we can now access full military records of virtually all Australian servicemen and women through the Australian National Archives, the brilliant Discovering Anzacs and the Australian War Memorial. These records tell us about bravery, sickness, hospitalisations and too often death.

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A small section of David Anderson’s Attestation Paper – Discovering Anzacs

What these records don’t tell us is that these brave men and women were far, far more than names, ranks and numbers. They were sons, daughters, brothers, sisters, mates, friends, boyfriends and girlfriends. Some were husbands, wives, fathers and mothers.

Sergeant David Samuel Anderson is just one of these men.

Military records tell us that David Samuel Anderson was born at ‘Lakeview’, Bergalia in 1892. David volunteered for the First World War and served in Gallipoli and Egypt before arriving in France in June 1916. His battalion (54th) was sent to relieve troops at Fromelles in northern France, close to Belgium. He was killed in the Battle of Fromelles (Pheasant Wood) on the 19 July 1916. By using DNA his body was finally identified in 2014.

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Sergeant Anderson’s headstone at Pheasant Wood Military Cemetery, Fromelles, Lille, Nord Pas de Calais, France

We are lucky enough to know that David Anderson’s life was far richer than any service records can possibly indicate. We  now know a lot about his life through many family recollections, shared memories and photographs.

We now know that:

David Anderson was a son and brother

David’s father, Joseph Clarke Anderson, died of Typhoid Fever at Lake View in 1896, leaving his wife Kissock with six young children to raise, and a property to manage.

Jill Byrnes

David's mother, Kissock Rae Anderson

David’s mother, Kissock Rae Anderson

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David Anderson ( bottom row second from right) with his five siblings.

David was certainly a good student

One of David’s exercise books from 1900 is currently on display in the Moruya Museum. He was only eight years old when he completed this beautiful handwriting exercise and the complicated mathematical operations on the second image – reducing Pounds, Shillings and Pence into Farthings. Even at this early age David was demonstrating very high levels of fine-motor coordination

David Anderson was also a school student. One of his exercise books from 1900 is on display at our museum

David Anderson was also a school student. One of his exercise books from 1900 is on display at our museum. David completed this handwriting exercise when he was 8 years old.

Schoolchildren who visit the museum are always impressed by the David's neat bookwork

Schoolchildren who visit the museum are always impressed by the David’s neat bookwork

David was a sportsman and mate

(Following Joseph Anderson’s death)…….Kissock moved to Sydney with the children and purchased and managed a boarding house for ‘gentlemen studying for the ministry’ in Ultimo. ‘Lake View’ passed to other family members. David continued his education in Sydney, and became a manufacturing jeweller. He was also in the Scottish Rifles and a keen rugby player.

Jill Byrnes

Family memories and photographs show us that the young student grew up loving Rugby. Here he is shown playing for Sydney teams.

Davis was a keen rugby player

Davis was a keen rugby player

...and a real mate

…and a real mate

David Anderson also played the piano

After looking at the beautifully neat, early exercise books, it is easy to see how that boy grew into a man who loved rugby, played the piano and also made fine jewellery.

David enjoyed playing the piano

David enjoyed playing the piano

David Anderson also left a sweetheart behind

Like many, many men who went off to battle, David didn’t just leave family and friends behind. Esther, his beautiful sweetheart , was left behind.

David also left behind Esther, his sweetheart

David also left behind Esther, his sweetheart

This bright young man, loving son and brother; jeweller, rugby player, mate and boyfriend; left Australia to fight in those battlefields of Africa, Asia and Europe. David’s family never saw him again.

David’s family got the news that David was ‘missing in action’ but always hoped he would somehow return home one day. It took 98 years before David’s body was finally identified from the mass grave dug by the Germans behind their lines.

Putting the story together, it appears David was one of those who broke through the formidable German defences and temporarily captured German trenches for some hours, before being encircled and killed. That is why he was in the grave dug by the Germans and not identified until 2014.

Jill Byrnes

Showing David's ring

Family member, Jill Byrnes at David’s grave . Jill is proudly wearing a ring crafted by David. His beloved tartan can also be seen.

I am extremely privileged by being given a glimpse into the short life of Sergeant David Samuel Anderson. While the Ode has always touched me, it will really resonate with me this year.

By looking at David’s intimate family photos, we are forced to realise the immensity of the sacrifice made by David and the many, many other Australians who went to war.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again;
They sit no more at familiar tables of home;
They have no lot in our labour of the day-time;
They shall sleep with honour as do we;

For the Fallen
Laurence Binyon
Stanzas 2,3 and 4

An amazing, interactive map of the Dardarnelles

Soldiers of the Eurobodalla

Moruya and District Historical Society is proud to announce the showing of six documentary films detailing the lives of five servicemen and one Nursing Sister from our local region, who served their country during the Great War. These films will be shown on ANZAC DAY 2015 in the Mechanics Institute Hall, Page Street, Moruya, commencing at 10.00am and running continuously throughout the day until 5.00pm.

This event is part of the special commemoration of the centenary of the landing by the ANZACS on the shores of Gallipoli. These films will subsequently be shown in the Moruya Museum as a part of a special small Gallipoli  exhibition at the normal Museum opening times.

The films are the work of filmmaker and society member Ian Hibberson,  who was sponsored by the MDHS following the receipt of to a grant from the Department of Veterans’ Affairs ANZAC Centenary Local Grants Program.

The films could not  have been created without the kind co-operation of some of the families and archival photographs and footage.

The names of those commemorated in these documentaries are:

RAYMOND CHARLES BISHOP, 55th.Batt.AIF, 14th.Brigade, KIA Fromelles in Northern France on 19th. July 1916.

NORMAN  BLAKE CORKHILL, Machine  Gun instructor and Navigator.

PEARL ELISABETH  CORKHILL  MM, Nursing Sister, Australian Army Nursing Service.

HERBERT  FREDERICK  HUTCHINGS, No.1 Field Company Engineers, Light  Horse.

HOLROYD ROBERT INNES, Driver and Gunner

JAMES STUART  LESLIE ROSS, Australian  Flying  Corps, Killed in a flying accident, Surbiton London, 1919.

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Ilma Waters obviously loved picnics. This phot was taken at a picnic at Moruya Heads in 1908.

Archbishop speaks out against ‘domestic decadence’ and ‘useless dolls’.

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS – LONDON – A Zeppelin that dropped bombs in England travelled at a height of 2000 feet. A few houses were destroyed. No lives were lost but some were injured. Four fires were caused in dwelling houses at Wallsend. One bomb fell into a room where a woman was bathing a baby. The woman was injured. No damage was done at Blyth. Many people took refuge in cellars. There was no panic. The raid lasted 40 minutes. The night was very dark.   17/4/1915

World War One zeppelin aircraft

World War One Zeppelin aircraft

Toohey’s – not good enough for the ‘lager lappers’

LAGER LAPPERS – The San Francisco liner Ventura has landed a thousand barrels of beer and four thousand cases ditto for the Sydney swankers. Ye ken, Australian beer is not good enough for the people who make their money here to guzzle, though it might be ten times better in quality than the imported stuff. These gluttons, perhaps, could afford to pay a much-increased tariff on their favorite beverage, and should be required to do so. Some of these lager lappers reckon it denotes kultur to mop up that insipid beverage, and very few of the general public would growl if a high tariff was placed on it. – “Exchange”   17/4/1915

SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC – For their annual celebration this year the pupils attending St. John’s Sunday School were treated to a river picnic at Malabar, being taken to the trysting ground in Mr. Weatherby’s launch. The children were regaled with abundance of good things dear to the youngsters’ hearts. During the afternoon prizes, donated by the parents and friends, were competed for. Much praise is due to Misses Ilma and Doris Walter, Bond, Rev. Rix and Mr. Debenham, assisted by a number of the parents for the excellent management and delightful time they gave their pupils.   17/4/1915

Ilma Waters obviously loved picnics. This phot was taken at a picnic at Moruya Heads in 1908.

Ilma Waters (far left) obviously loved picnics. This photo was taken at a picnic at Moruya Heads (North Head) in 1908.

HUGE SCHEME – The “Daily Express” says the Government has decided to purchase all breweries and licensed houses in the United Kingdom, and to establish a State monopoly of beer. Only light varieties of beer will be brewed and sold. A committee is working out the details of the scheme. The purchase price is estimated at over £200,000,000, payable in 4 per cent. licence bonds.   17/4/1915

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Archbishop Michael Kelly (1850 -1940

ARCHBISHOP KELLY says: “If the domestic decadence so marked in some modern circles is increased in the next generation to the same extent as it has been in the last, one wonders what sort of useless dolls will have the effrontery to call themselves women and seek for masculine admiration.   17/4/1915

MECHANICS’ MEETING – The monthly committee meeting was held on the 8th inst., Messrs. R. Dawson (chair), E.J. Egan, R. Knight, T. Flood, R.N. Carden, A.F. Emmott and R. Somerset being present. Among the correspondence received was a letter from the Fisk Jubilee Singers asking for vacant date for use of hall …A letter from the Literary Institutes’ Association asking the committee to write to the Member for the district to give his most cordial support towards securing an amendment in the Local Government Amending Bill exempting all Schools of Art and Literary Institutes from the payment of rates. The secretary was instructed to write the Association saying that this committee would co-operate; also write to Captain Millard asking him to do his utmost to bring about the desired effect….  17/4/1915

The Moruya Mechanic's Institute, Page St, Moruya re

The Moruya Mechanic’s Institute, Page St, Moruya re

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms.

Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication  entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Societyfor $20.

 

 

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Blackberries: As ruthless as a German – news from March, 1915

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

HOTEL LICENSE – Last Monday, the Licensing Bench visited Coxon’s Hotel, and , after inspecting the building, decided unanimously that the house was beyond repair, and that if a renewal of the license were desired, it would be necessary to build a new brick building. 27/3/1915

WAR HORSES – Mr. McNamara, of Bega, passed through Moruya for Nowra on Wednesday with 30 odd horses purchased in the Bega district, mostly, for the War Officials. There were some very nice animals in the mob, mostly on the heavy side. Mr. McNamara found it absolutely imperative to have a number of them shod in Moruya, as they were very lame through travelling so far without shoes. 27/3/1915

The 6th Regiment coming into Urgani to the water works at Guzza - From the Fred Hutchings Collections, MDHS.

These horses of the 6th Regiment coming into Urgani to the water works at Guzza are a long way from home – From the Fred Hutchings Collections, MDHS.

A GOOD SUGGESTION – Speaking at the official opening of the show, Mr. Austin Chapman M.H.R. said: “The rabbit had been the greatest curse and heaviest tax on the landholder.” He urged that the Government might well come to the rescue by helping to establish chilling depots in all small country centres and when the necessary machinery was available, giving a bonus on all rabbits caught, and organising for transport from the chilling depots, to central freezing works at seaports so that the consignments might be frozen there and consigned to the Belgians and others. It would be national work, helping the farmer, giving employment and relieving great distress, especially when the price of meat was becoming almost prohibitive. 27/3/1915

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A good sulky load (500) – MDHS Collection

 

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Recipes from 1915 using blackberries. The jam sounds good.

NOXIOUS WEEDS – The Eurobodalla Shire Council has been calling tenders for an Inspector of Noxious weeds etc. etc., during the past few weeks. If we recollect rightly the Council had a special Inspector going through the whole of the Shire Ridings something like 3 years ago, but what good was done in return for the money expended has in no way been made manifest.

The worst enemy the man on the land has to contend with is the blackberry; and from all appearances this hateful shrub is going just as strong as ever in and around Moruya; in fact it has taken possession of some of our streets and public roads and enjoys a most luxuriant growth in no less a public position than our Court House. According to a writer in the “Bulletin” who signs himself “Rimu,” the blackberry is something like the Germans, it won’t be knocked out without a stubborn fight. He says:

“As a firm believer in evolution I cannot help seeing that the lord and master of this planet is likely to be the blackberry bramble. True, it is only a vegetable, but it has an astonishing grip on the principles of living. It is as fierce as a Montenegrin, and as ruthless as a German; it multiplies by seeds, by suckers, and by cuttings; it is as intelligent as anything its own weight and size, and for dogged obstinacy, enduring pluck and low cunning it beats the bulldog, foxterrier, dingo and all other dogs. I recently wrestled in prayer, backed by a mattock and otherwise, with a patch of the herb, and was knocked out in the third round. I grubbed it out and burned every fragment I could find, after digging the ground over and raking it for particles of roots. After the first warm rain I counted and destroyed 78 blackberry plants and once more dug and raked the ground. After the second warm rain the plants numbered 215, and there are now about 2578, and the fruit crop promises to be very good, thank you”

Rimu . 27/3/1915

Rimu 'complained' about these berries.

Rimu ‘complained’ about these berries.

Seventeen 100 Years Ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

Beehive Store Vulcan St Abt 1890

The Evolution of Emmotts by Shirley Jurmann

From front verandah of “Merlyn” in Campbell Street to Harris Scarfe in Vulcan Street

Abraham Emmott was born 29th July 1814 in Addingham, Yorkshire, England. In 1837 he married Elizabeth Watson. Along with his wife and six children he arrived in Australia on the “Ellenborough” on 14th November 1855. A son James had died on the voyage. On arrival Abraham obtained employment with Newton Brothers in Sydney where he worked until 1859. He then came to Moruya and established his “Beehive” store in Campbell Street in the old Erin-Go-Bragh hotel (later called “Merlyn”) which had been moved from Broulee. He at first rented this building and then when it came up for sale, bought it.

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Emmotts first store in Campbell Street – MDHS Collection

The business was very successful largely due to the courtesy and attention of family members. Making customers comfortable and happy was a high priority. As well as serving the local community Emmotts supplied food and hardware for the diggers at the

John Emmott, target of bushrangers -  MDHS Collection

John Emmott, target of bushrangers – MDHS Collection

Nerrigundah and Araluen goldfields. In January 1864 Abraham’s son John was at their branch store in Nerrigundah. Most of the store owners had large quantities of gold on the premises. John went to bed in a room next to the store. While he slept thieves removed a panel from the wall and stole the day’s takings of gold dust. In April 1865 John was returning from the goldfields with some gold. He was attacked, shot in the leg and robbed of gold, a gold watch and other valuables by the bushrangers, the Clarke Gang. He survived but was left with a limp.

New larger shop premises were erected on the corner of Queen and Vulcan Streets in 1862. In 1888 an imposing residence was added next door. In later years the store was taken over by sons John and William. Around 1900 one of the people working for J. and W. Emmott was William Connors. He later went to Sydney but returned some years later to be the manager of the grocery department of Emmotts store. He later moved on to manage a store owned by the Bodalla Company at Bodalla. He continued on as manager when this store was taken over by A.F. Emmott and later bought the store from Mr Emmott.

In 1901 the question of street lighting was being discussed. The Acetylene Gas Company was asked to supply one street light for a trial of one month. Councillors were concerned about the expense but private use became more frequent as systems were improved. Emmmotts store was lit by acetylene gas for the first time in May 1902.

During the time of J. and W. Emmott , William lived in the residence until his retirement in about 1910. Grandson of the original owner (also called Abraham or A.F. Emmott) next took over the store. When he married in 1911 the residence became the home of his family. In her “Memories of Vulcan Street in the 1920s” daughter May Koellner nee Emmott described the interior of this house and her memories of living there.

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Emmotts in 1883 – Photo MDHS Collection

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Emmotts in 1890 – Photo MDHS Collection

Beehive Store Vulcan St Abt 1890

Emmotts in 1905 -Photo MDHS Collection

The store was large by small country town standards and sold just about everything. Most supplies, except for locally bought produce, had to come by boat. These supplies were picked up by horse drawn vehicles at the wharf and taken to the store. Deliveries to homes and farms were also at first by horse drawn vehicles. In 1912 Mr S. O’Cass was the driver of the delivery van. When delivering goods to Mogo he left the van and horses on the top of the hill near the school. The horses took fright and bolted, crashing into the bridge. The vehicle was somewhat damaged. Around 1915-16 Sid Louttit drove the delivery van. In her 1916 diary Caroline Collett mentions family members at Mungerarie getting a lift to or from town in the Emmott van. Sid farmed nearby. The comfort of customers was a prime consideration with chairs at all the counters. There was no self-service. Customers were served by a courteous employee . Groceries were on shelves behind the counter as were other goods in all departments.

In 1927 Abraham junior wanted to pursue his farming interests at Bodalla and so the store was sold. It continued to trade under the name “Emmotts”, with J. P. Sheridan and later his son Bernard as managers.
On the other side of the residence was another small store which in the late 1930s, early 1940s was a crockery and kitchen ware department of Emmotts. Vic Louttit was in charge of this until he left to enlist in the army in WWII.

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Counter staff at Emmotts before the opening of the new store. Far left is Mick O/Grady. Far right is Stan Honan -Photo MDHS Collection

In 1959 the business would be 100 years old. The premises needed to be modernised and expanded. It was decided to demolish the residence and rebuild the store. By August 1958 John W. Brown of Moruya had commenced the demolishment and reconstruction work. According to the “Moruya Advertiser” the store would be on ultra-modern lines. There would be a super-market with the latest American style refrigerator. All other departments would have the latest type fixtures, featuring goods on open display. The building was to be built in four stages, the first to be built on the vacant land right on the corner. When this stage was completed some departments would move into this, the other parts would be pulled down in stages and rebuilt. The old residence, part of which was being used as a part of the store and as storage space, would also be pulled down. By April 1959 a section of the new front was completed and work was progressing rapidly. A “Colour Parade” being held by British Paints and their distributors Emmotts, was so well attended it could not be held in the advertised CWA rooms so the newly completed super-market section of Emmotts had to be used.

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Flo Louttit in  costume -Wendy Craze Collection

In August 1959 Douglas Thomson declared the new premises open. There were various competitions with prizes held during the week. Entries exceeded expectation so Emmotts came to the party offering extra prizes. One competition was a fancy dress one with separate sections for adults and children.

Best 1859 style costume prizes were awarded to Mrs H. (Flo) Louttit and Mrs E. Whipp. Flo’s costume was indeed authentic as the dress had belonged to an ancestor of Ilma Walter who generously lent it to Flo. Most Original was given to Mrs A. Holmes.

Most Comical was won by Mrs Facer of Narooma. Each of these winners received a 5 pound open order.

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Entries in the Fancy Dress competition. From Left: Lexie Fairlie,Mrs Whipp, Heather Chesher, Mrs Marsh, Flo Louttit -Photo Shirley Jurmann Colection

In the children’s section the best 1859 style costume was won by Robyn Fairlie. Most original was won by Maurice Elliott and most comical by Paul Flynn. Each of the children received a 2 pound open order.
Over 100 entries were received in the drawing competition. 16 years and under was won by Terry Gray. 12 years and under was won by Stuart Veitch. 9 years and under was won by Bruce Brown. Consolation prizes were won by Jeanne Martin, Diana Pitt, Ronald Clarke, Shirley Lamont, Dawn Lamont and David Pheeney.`
The celebrations and bargains continued all week culminating in the Pony Club Parade on the Saturday. A competition was held for the “Best Kept Pony and Equipment”. The judges were Col Donnelly, Les Jeffery and Mr G. Smith.
The prizes were awarded as follows: 1st Brian Clarke, 2nd Bill Louttit, 3rd Terry Heffernan. Consolation prizes were awarded to Kathy Louttit, Yvonne Irving, Rhonda Mills and Lloyd Donnelly.

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Place getters in Pony Club Parade: Brian Clarke 1st, Bill Louttit 2nd and Terry Heffernan 3rd -Photo Bill and Ruth Louttit Collection

Another competition was held to guess the number of revolutions a “Fler” Chair would make in a working week. This was won by C.J. Dempsey of Kiora.

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Some of Emmotts staff late 1950s. Mrs Warburton, Shirley Barrington, Jill McDiarmid, Kay Heffernan and Brian Turnbull -Photo MDHS Collection

The shop expanded. A new hardware and building supplies section was opened where Woolies is now. A furniture department was opened in the old Amusu Hall, now Silly Willy’s. Another department opened further along Vulcan Street in the old Commercial Bank building, later CWA rooms and later still a chemist and now Firefly Interiors. This building had been purpose built by John Emmott in the early 1880s and was bought by the Bank in 1928. It was used as a bank until about the early 1950s when a new bank and residence was built on the opposite side of Vulcan Street.

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Interior of Allens store in 2006 -Photo MDHS Colection

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Emmotts store, at this stage trading as Allens – MDHS Colllection

 

The store continued to trade for around another twenty or so years under the Emmotts name until it was bought by Fosseys. It was later Grace Brothers, J.B. Youngs and later still Allens. Around this time some Year 12 students had some fun on their muck up day. They painted Emmotts on the front window, crossed that out and put Fosseys, crossed that out and put Grace Bros, crossed that out and put J.B. Youngs, crossed that out and put Allens. The frequent name changes were confusing. It now trades as Harris Scarfe, still providing the district with a great department store. It no longer has a grocery or supermarket department or hardware section or furniture department but many a tourist’s visit to Moruya would not be complete without a visit to this store.

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Harris Scarfe Store in 2015 -Photo Bill and Ruth Louttit Collection

Some people who have worked at the store over the last seventy or so years include: Elva Barrington, Jan McGuiness, Judith Rootsey, Joy Clulee, Reg Burns, Geraldine Heffernan, Jack McNamara, Bob Wilkins, Gordon Smith, Bob Dalby, Jill McDiamid, Barry Cowdroy, Jean Robbins, Norah Smith, Barbara Lamont, Corinne Millard, Yvonne Irving, Alex Wedutenko, Patsy Stubbs, Beverley Spicer, Dolly Windley, Mrs Warburton, Helen Brogan, Joan Beashel, Pat Curtis, Joan Burke, Margaret Gould, Ida Heffernan, Flo Louttit, Doug Gordon, Peter Bannon, John Hay, Mrs Shipp, Gordon Smith, Gordon Parrish, Keith Pickett, Brian Pollock, Col Jay, Keith Hazell, Lil Cooper, Rusty Russell, Alan Head, Dawn Head, Jimmy Streeter, Keith Woods, Shirley Barrington, Nell Constable, Kay Heffernan, Brian Turnbull, Mick O’Grady, Stan Honan, Pat O’Grady, Cecil Clark, Os Tessier, Marcella Lynch, Mylie Lavis, Reg Heffernan, Bill Turner, Albert Ferderer, John Flynn, Barry Irwin. Chris Heffernan worked there in school holidays from the time he was about twelve. J.P. Sheridan and son Bernard were managers at various times. For a lot of Moruya people a job at Emmotts or their successors was their first job on leaving school. For some it became a lifelong career.
References:
MDHS Pioneer Directories
“Moruya Advertiser”
“Memories of Vulcan Street Moruya in the 1920s” by May Koellner nee Emmott
Various publications of the MDHS
Interviews with locals including Bill and Ruth Louttit, Rankin McCarron, Fay Heffernan nee Cowdroy

Nerrigundah in the gold rush days

A Bachelor Tax In Season and Out – in the news from 100 years ago today

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:


SHOULD AUSTRALIA’S HALF-MILLION BACHELORS BE TAXED?
– In ordinary times the Bachelor Tax is a joke to be fired off at smoke-nights and sewing-meetings; but it appears to be a very serious problem just now, for Mr. J.B. Sharpe, Federal Member for Oxley, tells “Everylady’s Journal” for March (just issued) that he intends bringing a Bill before parliament for the purpose of imposing a tax on Australia’s half-million bachelors.

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 January, 1915

Sydney Morning Herald, 1 January, 1915

Following up the receipt of this information, “Everylady’s Journal” invited a number of prominent men to offer opinions upon the right or wrong of such a tax. Lord Mayor Sir David Hennessy says that bachelors ought to be taxed, and that he has always advocated a bachelor tax in season and out. Mr. Carmichael Minister of Public Instruction for New South Wales says that there are better ways, both of raising revenue and of getting our young men married off.

“The girls,” says Mr. Carmichael, “have the remedy in their own hands. They have the vote – let them make the proposals!” Altogether it is a bright and healthy discussion. 20/3/1915

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Image: Everylady’s Journal, 5 October 1918 (National Library of Australia). Originally entitled the New Idea, the Everylady’s Journal reverted to the New Idea in 1938

NERRIGUNDAH(From our Correspondent.) – Now that the winter is approaching with its usual cold nights Nerrigundah will feel the want of a warm room where people could spend a few hours in a social chat, a debate, or enjoy a game of cards, draughts, etc., to pass away the time and relieve the monotony, as well as read in some comfort the papers of the day, or some of the scores of magazines and books that the well-stocked library possesses in the local School of Arts. The School of Arts would be the proper place if that institution could be made attractive.

There was some talk last year and the year previous about building a fireplace so that the hall could be warmed up during the cold evenings, and as it is understood that sufficient funds are in hand why is it not spent in this very necessary work, and induce the public to become members. The School of Arts is a public building and has been subsidised by the Government for the benefit of the people and should be made accessable and comfortable. It is hoped that some steps will be taken at once to place this institution under sound and progressive management. 20/3/1915

Presbyterian Church, Evans Street, Moruya

PRESBYTERIANISM – To-morrow (Sunday), the Rev A.G. McDonald will preach his farewell sermon in the local Presbyterian Church, this gentleman having resigned his charge of this circuit. Those who know Mr. McDonald best exceedingly regret his decision to leave, being an eloquent preacher and a most energetic worker in his calling.

The Reverend gentleman’s presence was a decided acquisition to the concert platform, his delightful Scotch ballads being always enjoyed by the Moruya audience. He is a versatile entertainer and a brilliant conversationalist, having gained vast knowledge through his travels around the Globe, and his departure will leave a decided blank in our social life. 20/3/1915

Sydney Morning Herald, 4 January , 1915

Sydney Morning Herald, 4 January , 1915

BELGIAN MEETINGS – A number of Turlinjah and Bergalia residents met on Saturday night last, when it was decided to organise a dance for Easter Monday night, the proceeds to go towards the Belgian Relief Fund. Mrs. F. Gardiner and Miss M. Bown were appointed Secretaries and Mr. S. Shumack treasurer. The Committee of the Turlinjah Mechanics’ Institute will give the use of their hall free, Mrs. Shumack has kindly volunteered to supply the music and the residents will donate the refreshments… 20/3/1915

Seventeen ‘100 years ago‘ booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication, entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

These scenes must have been incomprehensible to our local diggers - from the photos of Fred Hutchings ( MDHS Museum)

A war time solution to bad behaviour and distinguished guests to ‘the Bay’

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

A women from Cairo - was she winked at? From the Fred Hutchings Collection, MDHS

A women from Cairo – was she winked at? From the Fred Hutchings Collection, MDHS

THE BAD AT THE FRONT – Something is said about the weeding-out of “undesirables” – drunks and gamblers, and soldiers who howl at night, and fellows who haunt the back streets of Cairo during the dark hours and wink at Egyptian girls – from the Australian forces in Egypt. These dubious characters, it is alleged, are to be sent back to Australia in disgrace, so that they may marry undesirably, and rear undesirable families, while the good men go to the front, and do battle with the Turk, and are shot by Abdul Fez.

This idea that the worst citizen should be carefully preserved from destruction, and get a free passage home to the place where he used to be a nuisance, and become one of the fathers of the community, and help to make our laws, and even go into Parliament, while the best citizen is killed, looks like an absurdity. Every undesirable who is already in the force should be carefully preserved. Every criminal, hunchback, forger, or other bad character who seeks to enlist should be enlisted with enthusiasm.

The drunkard should be taken on the evidence of his breath and his nose. The worst scoundrels should have extra pay, if necessary; and extra special uniforms, and on the day of battle they should go first, being the folk who can best be spared. They would certainly kill somebody before they died – “Bulletin”. 13/3/1915

These scenes must have been incomprehensible to our local diggers - from the photos of Fred Hutchings ( MDHS Museum)

These scenes must have been incomprehensible to our local diggers – from the photos of Fred Hutchings ( MDHS Museum)

THE SUPPLIERS of the Corunna Cheese Factory have unanimously resolved to donate a day’s milk, or a day’s cheese, to the Belgians and also to make regular monthly donations. 13/3/1915

A Studebaker of the time.

A Studebaker of the time.

MR. T. MITCHELL’S Studebaker motor car made a name for itself last week by flying up Larry’s and Araluen Mountains with six passengers and driver, to the Braidwood show and races and doing the trip, actual running time, in about 3 hours… 13/3/1915

BATEMAN’S BAY (From our Correspondent).- Included in the list of visitors at the Clyde Hotel this week were Sir Allen and Lady Taylor accompanied by Mrs. Stuart. The party were met at the Bay by Mr. G.H. James, Moruya. Sir Allen’s trip is of a semi-private nature. He left Sydney early Sunday morning and journeyed via Goulburn, Canberra and Braidwood, arriving at the Bay about 4 o’clock, having had the misfortune to encounter the westerly dust storm, so severe was it that on numerous occasions the car had to be stopped, the driver finding it impossible to see where he was going. Immediately on arrival Sir Allen proceeded to discharge his cargo of dust in Brookes’ swimming baths.

Mr George F and Coroline E  James of 55 Campbell Street Moruya met Sir and Lady Taylor at Batemen's Bay

Mr George F and Coroline E James of 55 Campbell Street Moruya met Sir Allen and Lady Taylor at Batemen’s Bay. The James are pictured here on a world cruise.

Sir Allen Arthur Taylor (1864 – 1940) was an Australian businessman and NSW state politician who was Lord Mayor of Sydney and a member of the NSW Legislative Council.

Sir Allen Arthur Taylor (1864 – 1940) was an Australian businessman and NSW state politician who was Lord Mayor of Sydney and a member of the NSW Legislative Council.

This being done and getting his vision cleared he was desirous of having a look round the Bay and inquiring about the different industries. Mr. James showed him round. As Sir Allen is a man who is charged to the finger tips with energy and progressiveness, he was much interested in the various little workings here. Whether he passed his magnetic wand over the place or gave it a push, new life has been infused in the Bay already, and it is hoped that he will visit this district often…13/3/1915

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society.

St John's Church of England,Moruya

Harvest Festivals and Agricultural Shows – a time of plenty

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

FESTIVAL – Harvest Festival services have been arranged for Sunday next at St. John’s Church, both morning and evening. The special preacher at the evening service will be the Rev. Canon Macdonnell, of Goulburn. The parishioners are invited to send gifts of cereals, fruit and vegetables to decorate the church and the useful things will, after the services, be donated to the local hospital. Considering the bountiful season this district has experienced, these services ought to appeal to everyone, and a hearty response made to the request for gifts.   13/2/1915

St John's Church of England,Moruya

St John’s Church of England,Moruya

MORUYA A. AND P. SOCIETY. – 41ST ANNUAL SHOW – …The Moruya Annual Show of 1915 was held on Wednesday and Thursday last under the most favourable auspices. Arrangements having been made with the Government to allow the Society £300 for removal expenses in lieu of the old Show ground of 8 ½ acres near the River, the committee at once set to work, and during the year removed the whole of the buildings, ring and yard fences to their present picturesque position on the Moruya Park. The Pavilion is erected on the eastern side of the Race Club’s Saddling paddock and the horse ring just in front of the Grand Stand, the cattle yards, pig pens and fowl coops having a lovely position on higher ground at the rear.

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon  photographed in their carriage at the Moruya Show in 1915

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon photographed in their carriage at the Moruya Show in 1915

The pavilion at Moruya Showground

OFFICIAL OPENING – Just prior to luncheon on the second day the ceremony of officially declaring the new Pavilion opened was performed by our Federal member Mr. Austin Chapman. Mr. D. Hutchinson, president of the Society, in introducing Mr. Chapman referred to the removal of the Show appointments from the old to the present new site. The change he said had cost about £400, about £300 of which had been given by the Government – and for which he had to thank the Labor Government – the balance having been expended by the Society. Captain Millard, our State member was also deserving of much kudos for the way he had worked the Government to vote the £300.

On rising, our Federal Member was greeted with a round of applause. He eloquently congratulated the Society on the improved change it had made from the old to the new premises. When at Berry he had expressed the opinion that the Berry Show ground appointments were about the best in the State. Since seeing Moruya appointments and the beautiful position it occupied he would have to retract that statement, for he now considered Moruya took the belt in that connection…Mr. Chapman dwelt on the great possibilities of the Moruya district and the probabilities of a coastal railway in the not far distant future…. Mr. Chapman then declared the new Show Ground opened.   13/2/1915

QUEEN STREET BOOT HOSPITAL – F. BENNETT has purchased the BOOT-REPAIRING BUSINESS recently carried on by Mr. E. Vaughan, in Vulcan Street. By using only the Best Material, combined with Good Workmanship, Attention to Business, the Prompt Delivery of Repairs entrusted to his care, and Moderate Charges, he hopes to merit a fair share of Public Patronage.   13/2/1915

Queen Street looking west - from Vulcan St towards Page Street. You can see the boot makers on the left hand side of the street.

Queen Street looking west – from Vulcan St towards Page Street. You can see the boot makers on the left hand side of the street.

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya  – http://www.mdhs.org.au.

Our latest publication Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

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News from Egypt AND an Oriental Circus – 100 years ago

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1915, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

NEWS FROM EGYPT – The following interesting letter has been received by Mr. & Mrs. G. Walter of the local Post Office, from their son Clem, who is with the Australian troops in Egypt: –

Mena Camp, Pyramids
Cairo Egypt
20/12/14

“Today our 3rd Battalion took part in a huge ceremony in Cairo, the taking over of Egypt. There are twelve Battalions here and only two were required to attend the procession, so you can imagine how proud we were when our colonel told us we were chosen, the seventh was the second choice. The remainder were very much cut up about the selection. We left camp at 6 a.m. and went by tram to Cairo, 10 miles.

On our arrival there we were lined up along the street for about a mile, one line on each side with fixed bayonets and 20 rounds of ball ammunition. There were thousands of spectators on top of buildings etc. We presented arms to the Sultan as he drove by in his magnificent carriage …After the ceremony we marched to the Barracks where we received light refreshments and a few minutes rest, then we marched back to Camp on an asphalt road, which made our feet very tired. We march to Cairo again on Wednesday, the whole of the Australian Troops 27,000, so it will be a fair sized procession. Richie and I go on leave tomorrow, we will do the block and procure a few curios, photos etc…

Monday, 21/12/14. This morning we paraded as usual, and were all very pleased when our dear old Colonel told us he was exceptionally pleased with the way we behaved yesterday at the procession; also he granted us a day’s leave to-day which of course made us all smile, and we had a day in Cairo. Rich and I rode donkeys half way and then caught a tram, you would have laughed had you seen us on the donkeys. We made beasts of ourselves in Cairo. We had two helpings of steak, fried potatoes, broad beans, two rolls of bread and beautiful date jam, tea etc. We visited a general store kept by a Greek. It was very interesting, there was an interpreter there and we had a long conversation.

We saw 15 different kinds of cheese, Egyptian cheese is pure white, not at all pleasant to taste. Whilst we were talking a chap came in, quite a young fellow, he could speak English, and he said he was a butter manufacturer. He asked us to see his factory which we did and were much amused. The educated Egyptian is a very refined gentleman and all like to converse with us and show us around; the Egyptian lady is exceptionally sweet.”

6/2/1915

3rd Battalion AIF

3rd Battalion AIF

EXPERIMENTAL FARM – Messrs R. Heffernan and Sons have very kindly supplied us with the four samples of potatoes grown on their Experimental Farm at Yarragee, which are “Satisfaction,” “Early Manistee,” “Manhatten” and “Up-to-Date.” Each variety is of large size and a decided credit to the farm. When we have sampled the lot in the pot we will give our opinion as to the best variety for the table. 6/2/1915

Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 2.28.40 pmCIRCUS – On Monday evening, Miss Kemp and Raphael’s circus and buckjumping show opened to a good house. The circus includes some novel and clever turns. A couple of bucking cows produced amusement, while among the horses a substantial reward is offered to the rider who can sit Ding Dong. This horse is a marvel, and can do anything within reason, including telling the time by a watch, adding up figures and dividing the total by a small number, and many other feats…. 6/2/1915

Seventeen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1914 are available ($5 ea) from the Society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the Society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Our latest publication entitled Kiora Kith and Kin, by Shirley Jurmann is also now available from the Society for $20.

The opening of the Kiora Bridge in 1890

‘Kiora Kith and Kin’ by Shirley Jurmann

The latest publication by the Moruya and District Historical Society is the wonderful book Kiora Kith and Kin, written by Shirley Jurmann.

Kiora Kith and Kin is the story of European settlement of the Kiora, Wamban and Mungerarie areas near Moruya on the south coast of NSW, Australia, and the pioneer families who lived there.

Shirley is a member of our society and it was with great pleasure that I asked her the following question. Shirley’s detailed answers demonstrate her not only her passion for the history of this beautiful area but also the collaborative nature of the writing process.

This book is on sale through the museum for the extremely reasonable price of $20. For details of the book’s contents click here.

The author as a very young visitor to Kiora with a Luck Street neighbour, Joyce Berriman.

BH: Before we discuss your book Kiora Kith and Kin, what does the district Kiora mean to you?
SJ: Kiora has always been a special place for me. My father’s family were not pioneer settlers but have had a close association with the place since the 1860s when my great grandfather Joseph Louttit started taking his boat up the river to collect the farmers’ produce to take to the Sydney markets. Early in the 1900s my grandfather Sid Louttit farmed there on one of the Collett farms. Later my Uncle Jack Louttit bought the original Collett homestead and had a market garden there. Other relatives also farmed at Kiora. My father, his brothers and one of his sisters attended the Kiora school. When I was a small child we often went for Sunday drives to visit my uncle, aunt and cousin.

BH: What inspired you to write your book Kiora Kith and Kin?
SJ: At the wake after my father’s funeral in 1972 I was given a copy of a Kiora school photo. In the photo were my father Roly Louttit and his brothers Jack and Vic. The names of all the children were on the back. A few years ago I looked at this photo again and began to wonder who these children were. I began to try to trace them. Who were their parents? What became of these children? Who did they marry? Did they stay in the Moruya/Kiora area or move on to perceived greener pastures? With the help of the Moruya and District Pioneer Registers, put out by the MDHS, and the NSW Births, Deaths and Marriage records, I was able to find that all of these children, except for the teacher’s family, were born in the area as had their parents and even some of their grandparents. They were all from long term Moruya/Kiora families. Some stayed, some moved on, some married locally born people. My interest in the families and area grew. I mentioned to Wendy Simes that I wouldn’t mind putting something together on Kiora for the MDHS. She seemed to think it wouldn’t be a bad idea.

BH: Where were you able to find your fascinating source material?
SJ: I began by going through as many books on the Moruya area as I could and extracting any mention of Kiora. I found out what I could about John Hawdon, first settler, the establishment of the Kiora Estate and Kiora House, the convicts, other settlers, the trials of floods, droughts, bushfires, tragedies. Wendy fed me information held by the MDHS including lists of convicts, people who had lived there, burials in the Kiora cemetery, photos, Phyllis Stiskin’s notes on the Kiora school. She arranged a meeting for me with Huw Owen-Jones, the present owner of Kiora House.

I combed through the Pioneer Directories for any reference to people living at Kiora. I knew several people who lived or had lived, at Kiora. I contacted everyone I could think of. They were all helpful. John Clarke wrote me a piece on his memories of who lived where in the 1940s-50s and provided some photos. Brian Clarke provided information and photos of the property “Jilambra”, originally part of the Hawdon Estate. Huw Owen-Jones allowed me to take photos of Kiora House and showed me paintings of Agnes Josephine Hawdon who died aged 4 in 1864. and of Kiora House when it was derelict. He showed me where Annie Hawdon had scratched her name and the date into a window pane with her diamond engagement ring, on the occasion of her 21st birthday and engagement party in 1865. It is still quite clearly visible.

The Hawdon family of Kiora

The Emmott and Hawdon families Correction: This is a photo of the Emmott family of Moruya dated 1887. Fortunately there are some Hawdons in the photo. Ernest Hawdon is back row on the right. His wife Elizabeth Hawdon nee Emmott is below him on the 2nd back row and their children Margaret, Werge, Ernie, John and Leslie are in the photo as well.

I contacted Sue Knight nee Collett to ask if she had any early Collett photos. She didn’t but referred me to Linda Robertson nee Collett. Surprise! She lived only about 20 minutes from me. I went to visit her and she was most helpful with information, photos and a photocopy of Caroline Collett’s 1916 Diary. My cousin Jennie Burgess nee Louttit, now in her 80s had lived as a child at Mungerarie House, the old Collett home built in the late 1850s. She was able to give me a description of the house and rooms. One memory she is not fond of was the 30 feet long hallway up the middle of the house which her house-proud mother insisted she polish every week on her hands and knees when she was only about 12.

John Tranter whose father started the Moruya Cordial factory in the old cheese factory shared some memories. Jenny Pollock nee Evans, a Hawdon descendant, shared some photos. At the MDHS one day I met by accident Damien Rodgers whose parents had done some of the restoration work on Kiora House. He told of a drawing done by convicts of the ship on which they came to Australia. It had accidently been painted over when renovations were being done. He spoke of seeing a ghost at the end of his bed one night. Presents owners have not seen any ghosts!

Bruce Coppin spoke of being one of the first on the scene of an accident in 1966. Eileen Irwin was driving across the Kiora Bridge when she lost control of the car. It hit the side and plunged into the water. The rescuers were able to pull her from the car but her daughter Karen aged 4 was not so lucky. It was the time before compulsory seatbelts. When the car turned over the small child was thrown under the dashboard where she became jammed. She was not found until it was too late and she drowned.

Debbie Bruen provided a photo of her 1990 wedding at Kiora House. It was fitting that she married there as she was descended from the Jeffery family who were early settlers to the area, Kathy Smith provided a photo of the original Kiora school and of her ancestor Daniel Green who was headmaster there. At first it seemed doubtful that Kiora had had such a school but in Phyllis Stiskin’s notes on the KIora school were the plans of just such a building. I found information on the internet about assisted immigrants.

The 100 year booklets put out by the MDHS provided newspaper reports of happenings to do with Kiora and I found other bits and pieces in old newspapers including my parents’ paper “The Moruya Advertiser”. Dawn Daken was an absolute treasure. She drove my sister-in-law Ruth and me around Kiora, showing us where everything was or had been. She showed us through the old church now converted into a cottage but with signs of the old church still visible, including an arched window and the interior churchlike ceiling. I had another accidental meeting of interest.

A couple of years ago I was returning from Moruya. I usually catch the bus to Sydney, spend a few hours there and catch the bus north to Port Macquarie. I was sitting in the waiting room and got chatting to the lady beside me. I mentioned that I was returning from Moruya. She said her mother grew up in Moruya. I asked the name and she said “Dulcie Shumack”. I immediately said “As in Kiora school teacher?” She was amazed that I knew the name as the family had been gone from the area by 1930. We exchanged bits of information.

BH: Do you have special or personal memories of an earlier Kiora?

Shirley Jurmann

SJ: My personal memories include visiting relatives and stories told by my father. As children we sometimes rode our bicycles out to the bridge. We even had some school swimming lessons there in the days before Moruya had a pool. Kiora House was derelict at that time and there were stories of it being haunted by convicts rattling chains! The Kiora school was closed and moved into Moruya. It was still there when I attended school there so I spent a couple of years of my schooling in the same room where my father had gone to school.

Another favourite anecdote would have to be the one about Annie Hawdon and her scratching her name and date into the window pane f Kiora House, and it is still there 150 years later! Picture the scene, very much like the attached parlour scene picture of the same year. The previous year would have been a sad one for the family with little Agnes Josephine, daughter of Annie’s brother William, dying at the age of 4 from diphtheria. Now was a chance to celebrate new happiness.

A typical parlour at the time that Ann Howdon

A typical parlour at the time that Ann Hawdon scratched her name and the date into the window pane

BH: You talk of many of the early settlers of the Kiora district. Did you have any favourite anecdotes about any of the early characters/settlers of the area?
SJ: One thing that really saddened me was reading about the early deaths of so many small children.

A favourite anecdote would have to be the one about Annie Hawdon and her scratching her name and date into the window pane, and it is still there 150 years later! The previous year would have been a sad one for the family with little Agnes Josephine, daughter of Annie’s brother William, dying at the age of 4 from diphtheria. Now was a chance to celebrate new happiness.

I was impressed by the restoration of “Jilambra” by Brian and Marylyn Clarke and the work done by various people to restore Kiora House.

BH: When doing your research did you discover any surprising facts about Kiora – the place or its people?
SJ: I knew Kiora had been much more closely populated than it is today but I was really surprised that at the time Moruya was declared a town in the 1850s Kiora was competing with Moruya in its rate of progress and expansion.

BH: Your book goes into detail about some of the surprising buildings businesses that were part of the thriving Kiora community. Do you have a favourite building out of the remaining structures?
SJ: Kiora House and Jilambra would have to be my favourite buildings. Their faithful restorations are wonderful to see and a credit to the people who did them.

Kiora House

Kiora House

BH What was the hardest part of putting your research into its current format?
SJ: I was continually writing, rewriting, adding, subtracting, refining and polishing as I went along. Just when I thought I had finished something else interesting would turn up. Eventually I thought I had put together enough. I sent it off to Wendy. She did a great job of editing, rearranging and regrouping items with a common theme and providing an index.

BH: Why did you choose to give your book the title Kiora Kith and Kin?
SJ: I wanted the book to be something more than an account of historical facts, more like a family history with anecdotes about families, how they came to the area and what they did. “Kith and Kin’’’ seemed to fit in with that idea and of course the “Ks” fitted in with Kiora! I am always looking for quirky titles to things I write!

BH Kiora has had a fascinating past. What do you think that the future has in store for Kiora?
SJ: I doubt that Kiora will ever see anything like its past. It is today a beautiful rural area with smaller holdings, a pleasant place to live, with lovely views and I hope it will always stay that way.

BH: Finally, what will be the topic of your next book or article?
SJ: I have written books on my mother’s and my father’s families. I enjoy researching my children-in-law’s families (they have some fascinating ancestors!). I have written several articles for the MDHS Journal and am at present working on one on Thalia Parbery whose husband drowned in the Moruya River in 1855. I would love to do anything on Moruya but I doubt that I could find anything as interesting as Kiora or with such a lot of information available.

The opening of the Kiora Bridge in 1890

The opening of the Kiora Bridge

Kiora Bridge today

Kiora Bridge today

The Kiora district today

The Kiora district today