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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

FIRE – On Friday night of last week the Tomakin sawmills were completely destroyed by fire.  The plant was insured.  The inquiry which was to have been held on Thursday, has been adjourned for ten days.   21/2/1914

ghriddledaWATER FOR STOCK – An appeal for some patriotic townsperson to take the matter in hand of collecting a sufficient sum to pay for the erection of a new windmill over the well at the eastern end of Church Street, has so far not materialised.  Now that our late Mayor, Mr. Flood, has returned to his district his sympathisers will, no doubt, move him to make this necessary provision for famishing stock.  21/2/1914

MOTOR CAR – It has been decided by the R.C. Church committee to purchase a motor car for their beloved Parish Priest, the Very Rev. P. Cassidy, a large amount of money having already been promised.  It will be remembered that a short time ago one of the buggies in use was damaged beyond repair, and the other one is only fit to be cast on to the scrap iron heap.  Taking this into consideration, as well as the probability of having to buy two fresh horses, it was considered wiser to invest in a motor car.  Apart from the necessity of purchasing a new conveyance, after 31 years of faithful and zealous service, it is only just and befitting that Father Cassidy should have a more expeditious and comfortable mode of travelling the long and lonely roads at all hours of the day at night to minister to and comfort the sick and dying than a worn out buggy and horse.  21/2/1914

Father Cassidy was the parish priest for Moruya's Sacred Heart Catholic Church
Father Cassidy was the parish priest for Moruya’s Sacred Heart Catholic Church

MEAT STRIKE – Owing to the meat strike in Sydney there is a famine in bacon, and the scarcity has extended to country districts.  The demand for fish exceeds the supply, whiting being sold at 75s per basket.  Poultry is at a premium and cheese is also scarce.  21/2/1914

nla.aus-vn1869789-tLIVING WAGEJudge Heydon’s report of the inquiry into the cost of living was published on Monday.  He fixed the standard of living wage for N.S.W. at £2 8s per week.  In any case in which the wages of a person are less than that amount, application may be made to the board to increase it to that amount.   21/2/1914

Wunderlich pressed metal was used extensively at the time for interior decoration
Wunderlich pressed metal was used extensively at the time for interior decoration

NEW SHOP – Queen Street has now a brand new butchery all its own, Mr. W. Ryan having moved into his new premises yesterday.  The building is a decided credit to the contractors, Messrs. C. Stubbs and J. Behringer.  It is lined throughout with Wunderlich and fitted with all the latest necessary requisites for a first-class butchery.  The cement floor is undoubtedly one of the best we have seen put down in the district, being the work of that skilled artisan, Mr. Charles Stuart.  21/2/1914

OPEN AIR PICTURES – Mr. A.H. Weatherby, who is ever alert in catering for the comfort and enjoyment of his patrons, has commenced the erection of a galvanised iron enclosure for an open air picture show on Mr. P. Flynn’s allotment adjoining Milliken’s blacksmithy in Church Street.  The structure, which is 65ft x 20ft, will contain a gallery, and will be covered by a movable canvas tent roof.  Mr. Weatherby, who should be highly commended for his pluck and enterprise, expects to screen his first film in the new building about the 1st prox.   21/2/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au). 

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