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One hundred years ago – 11 April

Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

VISIT OF LADIES’ COLLEGE OF HEALTH SPECIALIST – In another column will be found an announcement from Nurse Ricketts, the skilful Sydney specialist in the ailments of women, who represents the Ladies’ College of Health, 54 Oxford Street, Sydney.  In response to requests from a number of women, who are desirous of undergoing the treatment of the College, which has already effected numerous wonderful cures among local residents, Nurse Ricketts will make a special visit to Moruya next Tuesday when she may be consulted at the School of Arts. As no fee is made for consultations, this visit affords an opportunity which should be availed of by every woman in ill health to get expert opinion concerning her ailments. The Ladies’ College of Health, which has been established for over 20 years, enjoys a reputation throughout Australia for the successful treatment of hundreds of cases which had baffled leading physicians and surgeons for years…   11/4/1914

ILLNESS – His many friends will regret to hear of the serious illness of Mr. C. Brice, Sen., Postmaster of Wagonga.  His illness was of such an alarming nature that his people had him removed to Sydney.

The Bega Budget 18 April, 1914. The Lynch Bellringers continued on their South Coast Fatewell tour after performing at Moruya.

The Bega Budget
18 April, 1914. The Lynch Bellringers continued on their South Coast Fatewell tour after performing at Moruya.

LYNCH FAMILY BELL RINGERS – On Tuesday evening next this famous company of campanologians, well-known as the Lynch Family Musical Entertainers, will re-appear in Moruya, at the School of Arts, when they will introduce their remarkable handbell, specialty, and glassophone performances.  Since their last appearance here the Family has travelled greatly, and has journeyed half round the world, meeting with the success their undoubted talents deserve.  On this occasion they bring with them some novel attractions, notably the Aluminium Organ Chimes, an invention by Deagan, Chicago, U.S.A., which has recently been patented all over the world.  The tones of the instrument are said to be very beautiful.
Included in the English Concert Co are Miss Annie Kinnaird, the popular soprano; Mr. Ambrose Neilson, tenor; Mr. Will Rollow, society raconteur; and others. The bell ringers and glassophonists still form, however, the backbone of the entertainments, and those who have not heard them should certainly not miss this opportunity…   11/4/1914

EXODUS – After all the sports and pastimes which the people of this district have revelled in during the past few months one would naturally think that just now they would be resting on their oars. Not so, however, as on Monday morning no less than three packed motor cars left for the “Big Smoke,” besides an unusually large contingent by the s.s. Hillmeads, bent on participating in the gaieties of the Royal Show and A.J.C. big race carnival. With such an exodus of the sporting element a noticeable dullness will pervade Moruya for the time being.   11/4/1914

How many of the moruya locals followed this advertisement and met at the marble Bar in 1914.

The program for the 1914 Royal Easter Show. How many of the Moruya locals read the cover and met at the Marble Bar?

From The Bega Budget Wednesday 17 June, 1916

From The Bega Budget
Wednesday 17 June, 1916

THE ILLAWARRA & SOUTH COAST S.N. CO., LTD – Maintains frequent and regular PASSENGER and CARGO SERVICES (weather and other circumstances permitting) as under:

MORUYA – STEAMER HILLMEADS Will leave SYDNEY Every THURSDAY for MORUYA
Every SATURDAY afternoon or SUNDAY morning for SYDNEY.

S.S. EDEN leaves SYDNEY for BATEMAN’S BAY every THURSDAY at 12 noon,
and leaves BATEMAN’S BAY for SYDNEY every Saturday as tide permits.

Full particulars on application to Local Agent.
D.J.M. Sim, General Manager.

LOCAL AGENTS: Moruya – G Constable; tel. No.2.; Bateman’s Bay – S.G. Lewis.

11/4/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Batemans Bay Punt, 1915

Harbours, Bays and Floods -One hundred years ago – April, 1914

Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

Blog_Jan14HeaderOUR HARBOR – Mr. C. McInnes, formerly in charge of the training walls in the river and who has been raised to the position of Inspector of Harbor and Rivers, had a run down our local stream on his way through from Bega on Wednesday.  Mr. McInnes informed an “Examiner” representative that the channel along the lower stretch of training wall had deepened and was now 15ft at ordinary tide. The bar had silted up considerably through the recent flood, but was daily deepening, owing to normal conditions having set in.  The channel had somewhat silted up and altered, but to what extent could not be accurately ascertained until a thorough sounding had been taken.

Mr. McInnes is of our opinion that the Hillmeads should be taken off this trade as she draws considerably over the Bermagui, whose light draft enables her to easily cross the bar and negotiate the river at all reasonable seasons, which proves her to be the most desirable boat of the Illawarra fleet for this trade.  Besides she is as steady as a rock which makes her a favourite with passengers and those who export or import live stock.    4/4/1914

BAY PUNT – After long years of agitation and weary waiting the Minister has informed the Bateman’s Bay Progress Association that he has approved of the acceptance of a tender for the construction of an oil driven punt.  Our Federal Member passed over in the present slow conveyance during the inclement weather of last week, which, with an extra prick in the spinal chord from Capt. Millard no doubt, explains the Minister for Works’ hurry up.   4/4/1914

Batemans Bay Punt, 1915

Batemans Bay Punt, 1915

NELLIGEN (From our Correspondent) – At last the long dry spell is broken.  From Thursday night till Tuesday we received 19 inches (1902 points) of rain, the heaviest being Sunday night, it registering 610 points.  All the creeks and river were in flood, the creeks in some places being half a mile wide.  The river had every appearance of visiting our local publican’s bar, as it had already started to climb the steps.  Dent Bros. had between 150 and 200 sleepers packed on the wharf, and at 10 o’clock Monday night were seen waist deep in water securing them with wire to prevent them from being washed away.  All the fences for miles around have been washed away, most of the growing crops spoilt, and sand 18 inches deep washed on to most of the cultivated paddocks. Hundreds of pounds of damage have been done in the district, one farmer alone is estimated to have £200 damage done.

Two teamsters, Rogers and Shepherd, were camped at Torpey’s, and had a very nasty experience which they won’t care to go through again.  It appears that they camped in an old house and woke up to find the place half full of water and had to make their escape through a window, as one of them, I believe, couldn’t swim, were both lucky to escape alive, as the water rose within two feet of the top of the roof.  The water came down with such force that it turned Mr. Roger’s wagon completely over and washed away all his load along with Mr. Shepherd’s and a large quantity of harness. Between £400 and £500 worth of damage have been done.  To make matters worse four of Mr. Rogers valuable horses were drowned and three of them washed down as far as the Bay.  A rescue party went out on Tuesday to see what they could pick up.  Rugs, mats, jackets, and yards of material were picked up, cartridges, tea, sauce, vinegar, benzene and a cask of beer and other sundry items were rescued from the creek.

A cask of whisky was seen floating down the river followed by a crate of biscuits, then benzine…..  The place is an absolute wreck and will be some months before things are in shipshape order again.     4/4/1914

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Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

 

Boatshed

One hundred years ago – 28 March, 1914

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

Light Horse recruits leaving from Tathra wharf for WWI on the Star

Light Horse recruits leaving from Tathra wharf for WWI on the Star (1914}

LIGHT HORSE – No one turned up at the meeting on Saturday night, convened for the purpose of forming a corps of the Australian Light Horse.  The unfavourable weather was the primary cause.  We hope the matter will not be allowed to fizzle out, Martin, as we have the material to form a smart corps.  Besides each member is paid 4s a day and allowed 5s per week for his horse.   28/3/1914

FLOOD NOTES – The March flood of 1914 which visited this district during the early part of the week was exactly two feet lower at Mullenderree and on the flat land on this side of the river than the flood of 1898, just 16 years ago.  The flood in the river was equally as rapid and almost as high as the ’98 flood.

- Mr. Weatherby’s boat shed was wheeled round and now rests on the rocky foundation with the entrance looking downstream at an angle of 75 degrees.  The same gentleman’s pontoon and boats were saved through being tethered to Mr. Flynn’s fence whilst the oil launch was protected by being moored in a safe spot in Malabar Creek, as also was Mr. Pete Davis’s launch.

Mr Weatherby’s boatshed, circa 1910. Behind is Andy Millikin’s blacksmith and coachbuilder.

- The approach to the lower town wharf was washed away and a large hole 15 feet deep was washed out on the lower side just at the back of the stone wall. Other washaways in the vicinity of the store are in evidence, and the agent’s private office was left with a cant which gave that important structure an appearance anything but prepossessing.

- On Tuesday Mr. Martin McMahon brought his milking herd over from Malabar farm to this side of the river.  This gentleman had a brood sow and three slips drowned, but fortunately his prize boar and other valuable pigs escaped.

- The residences of Messrs. W. McIntosh, R.J. Matthews, and Jimmy Gay, one of our market gardeners, just below Dr. Quilter’s in Campbell-street were surrounded and the European families were removed by Capt. “Arty” Weatherby, assisted by Harry Davis, who rowed a boat round the lanes from the steamer’s wharf for the purpose.  The Gay celestial, however, preferred to sink or swim with his belongings and positively refused to budge from his castle, his lettuces and cabbage.

- Mr. and Mrs. J. Heffernan and family were rescued from their home, Mullenderree, on Tursday morning in a boat by Messrs. P. Lynch, Jack Davis, Bert Taylor and Jas. Donovan, when the water had risen nearly three feet throughout the house.

- The Graham family, who are working Mr. H.E. Simpson’s Mullenderree farm, found a friend in Mr. J.R. Milne, who removed them from their home in his wagonette when the water in the residence was ankle deep.  Both Messrs. Heffernan and Graham’s residences are built on high blocks, which will give our readers some idea of the depth of flood water over the flat land.

- Our farmers have suffered more or less heavily.  At Kiora the biggest losses were sustained. Mr. Kenneth Taylor had a plot of planter’s friend valued at £150 almost totally ruined, its value now being estimated at about £10.  Messrs. J. Louttit, F. Hancock, A. Russell and others higher up are reported as having suffered serious losses.

- At Bodalla four out of five cows trying to cross from Greenway to Trunkitabella were carried down the Tuross River and drowned.

The winds and floods have caused so many breakages to our telegraph lines, and washaways and bog holes on our main roads that telegraph and mail business has been completely disorganised during the last four or five days. The mails from Sydney via the coast and Braidwood, also those from Bega were cut off, and with so many telegraph lines down Moruya residents were kept in the dark as to how the outside world wagged…   28/3/1914

While this photograph was taken after the 1925 flood the aftermath of the 1914 flood would have been similar.

While this photograph was taken after the 1925 flood the aftermath of the 1914 flood would have been similar.

 

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms. Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

 

 

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Mr Emmott Blasts Queen Street -One hundred years ago, March, 1914

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

The Burra Creek

The Burra Creek

WATER SUPPLY. – The very changes in the seasons from what they were 50 years ago and the gradual tendency to dry spells, which are increasing to longer durations as each summer passes by, is quite sufficient to cause alarm in the breasts of our householders, stockraisers and agriculturalists.  “God helps those who help themselves” has been demonstrated beyond controversy, and now that the residents of our coastal rivers are having their eyes opened to the great possibilities staring them in the face by the conservation of these waters for domestic and irrigation purposes, is it not high time for Moruya to fall into line and urge our claims on the Powers that be and thus be entitled to claim God’s favours for personal exertion…Our article in a recent issue has, we are pleased to know, evoked an intelligent interest in the proposition suggested viz., the damming of the river somewhere above the Burra, and if the same interest increases and the majority become imbued with faith in our project, then, and not till then, may we expect its realisation.  Mr. Shire Engineer, R.L. Dawson, is with us in this matter, and we are hopeful of an article from him soon, dealing with the subject from an engineer’s point of view

Mr, Havison, editor of the Moruya Examiner

Mr, Havison, editor of the Moruya Examiner

The following letter was received during the week, and altho’ marked private we have decided to publish it, omitting the writer’s name: – Leichhardt, March 17th, 1914.  Dear Harvison. – I read with great interest your article on the subject of irrigating the flat lands on the Moruya River. To build a dam anywhere in the Moruya River or anywhere nearer the mouth than the junction of the Burra Creek would be too costly and otherwise unsuitable; but by going up the Burra Creek towards Coondella, you will come across a place where the creek flows through a very narrow gorge cut out of the red droonian slates, a very suitable place for the erection of a dam at comparatively little cost.  The whole of the Coondella valley would form one huge reservoir, holding millions of tons of water, and as the land is nearly all Crown lands little compensation or resumption would be required.  The catchment area would include all the waters of the Diamond Creek and the lateral tributaries of the Burra Creek sufficient to keep the reservoir full in ordinary seasons.  I think it would be sufficiently high to reach by gravitation the highest point in the town supplying sufficient water for domestic and sanitary purposes, leaving an ample supply for irrigation of the lands (arable) below the dam and reservoir.  The water could be conveyed by open cuts and flumes for irrigation and by pipes for domestic and sanitation.  Go up the Burra Creek some day and have a look, follow up the creek you will come to the narrow gorge I refer to.”    21/3/1914

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The young Abraham Emmott

EARTH LOOSENING. – During the week Mr. A.F. Emmott had a small paddock in Queen St. East loosened up by means of gelignite exploded in auger-holes.  Mr. Emmott intends growing lucerne on the land so treated.  The work was carried out by Mr. A. Mison, sen.    21/3/1914

LEVANTE. – Levante, who gave an exhibition of his famous dive in McCauley’s baths at noon – handcuffed, legironed and chained, and from which he freed himself in 15 seconds under water, supported by Czernick, gave an entertainment in the Mechanics’ Hall at night (Saturday).  Several of their escapes and slight of hand tricks were clever, but, unfortunately for the performers, the attendance was small and the door money consequently small.  21/3/1914

Levante2Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

One of the homes and public buildings in the Eurobodalla area built by JT Borgan

A ‘roarty” time in a Cadillac – One hundred years ago- March 1914

Blog_Jan14HeaderShire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

imagesLIGHT HORSE – Sergeant-Major Holman is expected in Moruya early next month to swear in all those willing to join the corps of the Australian Light Horse.  Now’s your chance boys!   14/3/1914

TRIP TO BRAIDWOOD – The Moruya contingent who visited the Braidwood show and races per Mr. Harrison’s splendid Cadillac motor car, had a “roarty” time, as on the return trip, in the afternoon, no less than 27 bottles of champagne were “popped” off.  Thanks, Mr. Patrick Coffey! May your shadow never grow less.   14/3/1914

PICTURE PALACE – Mr. J.T. Brogan has just completed Mr. A.H. Weatherby’s new Picture Palace in Church Street.  The building is 65ft. overall  x 20ft., floored and seated, with a centre passage running from the main entrance in Church Street.  The seats are raised in tiers towards the back, winding up with a gallery with chair room on each landing.  Over the door is erected the electric lantern, which is fed by a dynamo outside on the eastern end of the main building.  The pictures are thrown onto a white-painted tin screen which gives the audience an uninterrupted view from all parts of the house.  There are escape doors on each side and the Palace will be splendidly ventilated, having a movable canvas covering.  Altogether Mr. Weatherby is to be congratulated, as is also his trusty builder, Mr. Brogan, on the up-to-dateness of “Moruya Picture Palace.”  The building is illuminated with electricity and acetylene gas, the latter being installed by Mr. I.S. Wilson.    14/3/1914

One of the homes and public buildings in the Eurobodalla area built by JT Borgan

One of the homes and public buildings in the Eurobodalla area built by JT Brogan

NO CHANGE – Mr. Wilson, of the Government Meteorological Bureau, stated recently that neither rainfall not temperature showed any change compared with what it was 50 or 60 years ago.  Also that our old men think our summers are warmer because they are aging and less able to stand hard work, and they think it colder in winter because their medical advisers tell them to wrap up and nurse their rheumatism.   14/3/1914

BATEMANS BAY (From Our Correspondent) – On Friday last, Dr. Johnson and party arrived at the Bay, all the way from Parkes.  Having heard out there of the plentiful supply of fish and oysters at Bateman’s Bay they decided to sample them, and since their arrival at the Clyde Hotel they have not wasted much time in their endeavours to slaughter the fish, and by the bye it is truly wonderful how fish grow after death.  Dr. Johnson (a real good sport) caught a flathead on Saturday, when drawn into the boat its weight was 4 ½ lbs, and on Monday amongst the general topics in Parkes it was ascertained that its weight was 17lbs.  Parkes should be a good place to breed fish…   14/3/1914

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An early photo of Batemans Bay – well before the bridge

Many of the youths trained in this scheme went on to serve in the First AIF during World War I

Many of the youths trained in this scheme went on to serve in the First AIF during World War I

UNIVERSAL TRAINING – All boys who reach the age of 14 during 1914 are obliged to register themselves in accordance with the universal training scheme during the present month.  Registration forms are obtainable at post offices.    14/3/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au). 

The Bank of NSWin Moruya, 1890

The First Tango In Moruya – and other news of 100 years ago!

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

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Sir Austin Chapman – member for Eden- Monaro (1901 – his death, 1926)

IRRIGATION – The project of utilising the waters of the Shoalhaven River for the purpose of irrigation and its inevitable results, as propounded by Mr. Austin Chapman at the official opening of the Nowra Show, opens up a vista of immense possibilities that loom up by the application or employment of the same scheme to all the eastern rivers, most of which are cut out by Nature to be simple work for the engineer to dam and utilise for irrigation.

To localise the subject we need only imagine a dam across the Moruya River, anywhere above Kiora, with a main laid on down each side irrigating the futile lands of our river.  We picture in our mind’s eye the abundance of Nature on her broad acres; we see the smiling farmer who no longer reads the weather forecast with a troubled look, or sadly contemplates a windmill working a pump in a dry well, but who joyfully struggles to load his pumpkins with a derrick, and the man with the town water supply on a cart slowly plodding his way from the cross roads is only a half incredulous remembrance.  We can imagine the same results from the damming of the Tuross for Bodalla, and of the Brogo and Bemboka rivers for Bega.p

Whether such work should be carried out by the Government or by the people interested, assisted by the Government, or by joint stock companies, we leave to others to consider.  But one thing is certain – that the rich lands of the eastern rivers is too valuable an asset to be left to the capriciousness of the weather while the facility for irrigation is so conveniently available and the advantages that would accrue from it are outside the bounds of calculation.  7/3/1914

GOOD RETURN – On Saturday last the young Motbeys (brothers and cousin) lodged at the local bank of N.S.W. as ingot of gold weighing 101 ounces, the result of a crushing of 19 ½ tons of stone from their Grasstree Creek, Nerrigundah, mine.  Since these young men struck gold a few months ago, they have taken £800 worth from this mine, the metal being of the highest standard, realising £4 3s 6d per ounce.  In the last crushing the lucky owners put through “everything,” and the shaft is now down 90ft.  Very rich stone is in sight. – Cobargo “Chronicle.”   7/3/1914

The Bank of NSWin Moruya, 1890

The Bank of NSWin Moruya, 1890

“TANGO” – We have received from Chapman’s, music importers of 694 George St., Sydney, a copy of the “Tango Rag,” the new and inspiring ballroom craze.  This firm has secured the Australian publishing rights for this dance piece, which has set fire to the musical world in all countries.   7/3/1914

The Tango craze was sweeping the world in 1914

The Tango craze was sweeping the world in 1914

PLEASED – District residents, more especially those residing in the vicinity of Gundary, are pleased beyond measure that the death of Mr. A. Crapp’s fine draught gelding has now been proved beyond a doubt to have been accidental, and not the work of a human being as was suspected from first appearances.  When he had read the account of the animal’s death in the “Examiner,” and the suspicion of foul play, Mr. John Coppin was so perturbed in mind that he got up at daylight on the following morning (Sunday) with the determination that every spot of the small paddock in which the horse was running would be so minutely examined that if accidental the discovery would be made and the horrible suspicion of foul play removed.  Mr. Coppin’s efforts were, we are pleased to say, fully rewarded, for in the paddock he picked up a broken pickle bottle with  spiked piece attached to the thick bottom of the bottle.  This piece was about the width of a butcher’s knife, about 2 ½ inches long, and as sharp as a lance, had blood and hair upon it, and there were traces of blood alongside the bottle.  Mr. Coppin is perfectly satisfied that this piece of glass caused the horse’s death, and is naturally pleased with his discovery, as is also the public, as it removes all suspicions.   7/3/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au). 

Mawson's ship. The Aurora

One hundred years ago – 28 February

Blog_Jan14HeaderShire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

GARAGEimageMr. George Harrison, who was the first to introduce passenger motor cars into Moruya, is now placing over £300 worth of machinery into his Moruya garage.  Mr. Harrison and his two sons, all three expert drivers, have become very popular with the travelling public, with the result that Mr. Harrison is rapidly extending his business and it is predicted that before very long the whole coast from Eden to Nowra will be connected by his cars.   28/2/1914

GARBAGE TIP – The Shire Council should move at once for the selection of a garbage tip and the appointment of a carter.  At present there is no recognised tip, as far as we know, and for many months there has been no recognised scavenger, with the result that householders have been obliged to get rid of their rubbish the best way they could and, naturally they deposit it in the most convenient place possible, which is over the river bank above the old town baths.  Making this place a garbage tip is a crying shame to those with authority to prevent it.   28/2/1914

The unlucky fishing party left The Criterion Hotel, Moruya at 3am

The unlucky fishing party left The Criterion Hotel, Moruya at 3am

CLOSE CALL – On Saturday last Mr. V.W. McCauley, “Cook” Lynch and a tea traveller named McKenzie, had a most miraculous escape from a watery grave.  It appears that the trio left the Criterion Hotel at 3 a.m. on the day in question in McCauley’s oil launch for a day’s deep-sea fishing, and everything going right safely negotiated the bar and were soon amongst the schnapper, several large ones being successfully hooked and safely landed on board the little craft.  During the day however the wind got up and a great sea arose which tossed the ship around like a cockle shell.  Although the engine was put at full speed little headway could be made against the buffeting waves and lashing spray, and by the time the bar was reached a tremendous sea was breaking right across it.  To make matters worse the launch had got too close up to slue, and with three great waves following in succession close in her wake there was no alternative but dash ahead into the wild breakers foaming and roaring across the bar.  Just as the crew got soaked to the skin and the boat partly filled the first of three mighty seas lifted her towards the southern side, she was then immediately caught by the second and carried over to the end of the breakwater when Captain “Mac” left the tiller calling out “It’s all over with us boys!”  Fortunately, just at this critical moment the last of the three big waves appeared on the scene and striking the helpless craft turned her like a top from off the end of the breakwater wall and carried her almost as high as the pilot’s residence (“Cook” says as high as the flagstaff) right into the river.  It was the first time on record that the intrepid Vin’s heart failed him and the brave “Cook” was heard to pray.   28/2/1914

Douglas Mawson

Douglas Mawson

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS- ADELAIDE – The Aurora reached anchor at 3 o’clock yesterday.  The exploring party are all well.  Mawson said last night that Biological material obtained is the best taken from the Antarctic.  Operations were extended two miles below the sea.  It was very remarkable that fish and animals of all kinds were discovered, many important discoveries being made.  Nearly everything was new to science.  Mawson said they had very trying times at Adele Land.  The place is the worst climate in the world.  The winds were terrific, very little sledging being undertaken this year.  Mawson had a marvellous escape when returning to above after the deaths of Minnis and Meitz.  He was 30 days regaining the base and was reduced to the last stages of exhaustion…  28/2/1914

Mawson's ship. The Aurora

Mawson’s ship. The Aurora

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au). 

Father Cassidy was the parish priest for Moruya's Sacred Heart Catholic Church

One hundred years ago today – 21 February

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Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

FIRE – On Friday night of last week the Tomakin sawmills were completely destroyed by fire.  The plant was insured.  The inquiry which was to have been held on Thursday, has been adjourned for ten days.   21/2/1914

ghriddledaWATER FOR STOCK – An appeal for some patriotic townsperson to take the matter in hand of collecting a sufficient sum to pay for the erection of a new windmill over the well at the eastern end of Church Street, has so far not materialised.  Now that our late Mayor, Mr. Flood, has returned to his district his sympathisers will, no doubt, move him to make this necessary provision for famishing stock.  21/2/1914

MOTOR CAR – It has been decided by the R.C. Church committee to purchase a motor car for their beloved Parish Priest, the Very Rev. P. Cassidy, a large amount of money having already been promised.  It will be remembered that a short time ago one of the buggies in use was damaged beyond repair, and the other one is only fit to be cast on to the scrap iron heap.  Taking this into consideration, as well as the probability of having to buy two fresh horses, it was considered wiser to invest in a motor car.  Apart from the necessity of purchasing a new conveyance, after 31 years of faithful and zealous service, it is only just and befitting that Father Cassidy should have a more expeditious and comfortable mode of travelling the long and lonely roads at all hours of the day at night to minister to and comfort the sick and dying than a worn out buggy and horse.  21/2/1914

Father Cassidy was the parish priest for Moruya's Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Father Cassidy was the parish priest for Moruya’s Sacred Heart Catholic Church

MEAT STRIKE – Owing to the meat strike in Sydney there is a famine in bacon, and the scarcity has extended to country districts.  The demand for fish exceeds the supply, whiting being sold at 75s per basket.  Poultry is at a premium and cheese is also scarce.  21/2/1914

nla.aus-vn1869789-tLIVING WAGEJudge Heydon’s report of the inquiry into the cost of living was published on Monday.  He fixed the standard of living wage for N.S.W. at £2 8s per week.  In any case in which the wages of a person are less than that amount, application may be made to the board to increase it to that amount.   21/2/1914

Wunderlich pressed metal was used extensively at the time for interior decoration

Wunderlich pressed metal was used extensively at the time for interior decoration

NEW SHOP – Queen Street has now a brand new butchery all its own, Mr. W. Ryan having moved into his new premises yesterday.  The building is a decided credit to the contractors, Messrs. C. Stubbs and J. Behringer.  It is lined throughout with Wunderlich and fitted with all the latest necessary requisites for a first-class butchery.  The cement floor is undoubtedly one of the best we have seen put down in the district, being the work of that skilled artisan, Mr. Charles Stuart.  21/2/1914

OPEN AIR PICTURES – Mr. A.H. Weatherby, who is ever alert in catering for the comfort and enjoyment of his patrons, has commenced the erection of a galvanised iron enclosure for an open air picture show on Mr. P. Flynn’s allotment adjoining Milliken’s blacksmithy in Church Street.  The structure, which is 65ft x 20ft, will contain a gallery, and will be covered by a movable canvas tent roof.  Mr. Weatherby, who should be highly commended for his pluck and enterprise, expects to screen his first film in the new building about the 1st prox.   21/2/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au). 

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon at the Moruya Show in 1915.

One hundred years ago today – 14 February

Blog_Jan14HeaderShire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

TomatoEtchingLARGE TOMATO – Mr. R. Knight, local saddler, who has a penchant for a variety of occupations, not the least being the cultivation of the wholesome “love apple” or tomato, showing us during the week a specimen of the ponderosa variety, grown in his vegetable garden, which measured 17 inches in circumference.  We did not get the opportunity of testing the flavour of this particular fruit, as it was required for the seed, but have no doubt that when Richard reads this neighbourly notice we will have scores handed to us over the garden fence.  14/2/1914

CIRCUS – Eroni’s circus opened to a crowded house on Wednesday night, their large seating accommodation being taxed to the utmost.  The various acts of this combination of clever artists were loudly applauded.  The contortion and trapeze turns by Miss Winifred Cortelli were particularly clever, as was also the ladder balancing by the Lucasimatroupe.  The long and high jumping by two greyhounds was another excellent act but the star performance was the high jumping by the champion of Australasia, “Landlock,” …and the bonny pony “Silver Charlie.”  …The troupe was to have given another exhibition last night, a gold medal being donated for the best local high jumping horse.  14/2/1914

This advertisenent for the Erini Brothers' Circus was published in April 1914 - just two months after their visit to Moruya.

This advertisenent for the Erini Brothers’ Circus was published in April 1914 – just two months after their visit to Moruya.

Moruya Public School- Then and Now

Moruya Public School- Then and Now

EXAMINATION – The following honors have been gained by pupils attending the local Public School at the recent examinations for qualifying certificates in November last.  Myrtle Colefax, bursary, tenable at the Girl’s High School, Sydney; Auna Egan and Florrie Thomson, scholarships at the High School, Goulburn.  14/2/1914

MORUYA SHOW – The 40th annual Show of the Moruya Agricultural and Pastoral Society eventuated on Wednesday and Thursday last under ideal weather conditions.  Owing to the protracted drought it was feared that the year’s show would be a big failure, but in this the committee and public were favourably disappointed, the entries being very fair indeed, and the attendance larger than last year…   14/2/1914

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon at the Moruya Show in 1915.

Elizabeth and Victoria Maud Mallon at the Moruya Show in 1915.

HORSE KILLED – Mr.  Alf Crapp had the serious misfortune to lose his most valuable draught gelding on Monday night last.  The animal, with the others of his fine team, was fed as usual after the day’s work on Monday night, and with the others as usual left in a small allotment surrounding the stable, in and out of which they could go at will.  On the following morning about dawn when Mr. Crappwent to feed them he found “Baldy,” the best and youngest horse of his team, valued at £60, lying dead in the stable near the door with a deep gash below the brisket, in the region of the heart, and surrounded by a pool of blood.  The poor brute must have dropped down and died without a struggle, as there was no evidence of even a kick on the soft earthen floor where he lay.  A careful examination of the allotment and stable was made by a number of expert horsey men, but there was nothing found that could have caused the wound, and the opinion, reluctantly expressed, was that the poor beast had been pierced to the heart by some inhuman brute.  Mr. Alf Crapp is known to be one of the most sympathetic, kind-hearted and honest men in the district, and that he could have an enemy guilty of such an inhuman and dastardly act is beyond comprehension… 14/2/1914

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).

Club House Hotel, Queen Street Moruya c1925

One Hundred Years Ago – February 7, 1914.

Blog_Jan14Header

Shire-wide news extracts from the Moruya Examiner of this time in 1914, provided by the Moruya & District Historical Society:

MORUYA ANNUAL RACES, 1914 – The races which eventuated on Monday and Tuesday last can be written a big success in every respect, more especially from a financial and interesting point of view.  Both days were fine and warm with a refreshing breeze from off the river, which invariably blows across the park course to make conditions pleasing.  The course, owing to the heavy work done upon it by so many horses and ponies in training during the past few weeks, was considerably chopped up on the surface which rendered it safe and pleasant going for the gee gees, although somewhat on the slow side.  There was a record attendance as shown by the gate receipts, visitors coming from all parts of the compass, mostly by motor car…The whole of the prize money was taken out of the district, the only portion of the 200 golden sovereigns left being a paltry ten which could not be given away as it was donated for district-owned horses only….W.J. Lynch, the enterprising Narooma hotel keeper, had charge of the booth and must have had a record turnover, judging by the crowd that thronged the bars.  Mr. Lynch is no novice at the game, and the excellent attention he gave the public by his numerous and smart staff was the subject of much favourable comment.  Mr. C. Johnson had an excellent tea and refreshment stall, the fruit stall being run by Mrs. Norman, of Araluen, and Mr. George Chewying, of the People’s Store…  7/2/1914

A finish at the old Moruya Race track

A finish at the old Moruya Race Track- now the Moruya Showground.

EURBODALLA – Quite a gloom was cast over Eurobodalla last Thursday week when it became known that Joe Lavis, aged 27 years, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Lavis, of “Thistlewood,” Bodalla, was accidently killed whilst drawing logs for the sawmill.  Poor Jack, it is surmised, got mixed up in the harness somehow whilst endeavouring to stop his team which got out of his control owing to the breeching breaking on his shafter.  How the unfortunate fellow came to get under the wheel will always remain a mystery.  His mate, Mr. J. Reed, who was only a few minutes behind the unfortunate fellow, was terribly shocked to find his poor mate almost lifeless, the log that was on the deceased’s jinker is estimated to weigh about four tons.  Joe Lavis was an all-round favourite and was connected with horse-racing, and he told the writer the day he was killed that he intended to go to Moruya races, but such was not to be….7/2/1914

TAILORING – Mr. Myrt. Connell, a representative of the firm of Pritchard and Co., will be in Moruya on the 8th to the 11th inst., and may be consulted at McKeon’s Hotel.  Mr. Pritchard is well-known in Moruya, having represented the Hagons for 16 years.  Mr. Myrt Connell will have with him a complete assortment of suit materials, as well as newest and most fashionable styles of the present day to choose from.   7/2/1914

Vulcan Styreet(looking north ) with Mr McKeon's Commercial Hotel on the site of the current Monarch Hotel.

Vulcan Street (looking north ) with Mr McKeon’s Commercial Hotel on the site of the current Monarch Hotel. This is where men could order their tailor-made suits from a visiting tailor. This is a system still in use today with tailors from Hong Kong or Bangkok flying into the large cities so that businessmen can oreder quality suits at reasonable prices. Nothing much has really changed in one hundred years!

MCCAULEY’S BATHS – The opening of Mr. V.W. McCauley’s baths took place on Saturday last.  A small entrance fee was charged to the enclosure to assist in paying for the prizes, but the bulk of the visitors evidently preferred viewing the contests from off the bridge, and consequently rendered no financial assistance to the plucky promoter, although, no doubt, all would have given a small contribution had they been called upon….7/2/1914

An early advertisement for the Club House Hotel from the Moruya Examiner.

An early advertisement for the Club House Hotel from the Moruya Examiner.

CLUB HOUSE HOTEL – The above popular Hostelry since coming into the possession of the present owner has been thoroughly renovated throughout, brilliantly lighted with Acetylene Gas, and is now one of the most up-to-date Houses for Cheerfulness, Comfort and Civility on the South Coast. – Only the Best Brands of Wines, Ales and Spirits Sold – Horse Stalls, Boxes, Motor and Buggy Sheds of the Very Best. – Fred Ryan, Proprietor, Queens Street, Moruya

Club House Hotel, Queen Street Moruya c1925

Club House Hotel, Queen Street Moruya c1925

Sixteen 100 years ago booklets containing articles for the years 1899 to 1913 are available ($5 ea) from the society’s rooms.  Copies of local newspapers from the 1860s to date can be viewed at the society’s Family History Research Centre (Ph 4474 3224) situated at the rear of the Pioneer Museum in Campbell St. Moruya (mdhs.org.au).